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'A Different Kind of Attention Develops Sound Judgment' | 'Suppose I'm Right Here?…' (posted 3/23 & 3/5/2014). Over 680 posts, Public-Interest Investigative Blogging On These Matters Since 2009.

Posts Tagged ‘Parenting Coordination

Progressive Language Creep Section from 2012 “Reconceptualize This” post (reviewed and reformatted 2017)

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CONTEXT, SEQUENCE of this Post with its 2012 parent…

Any post on this blog should stand alone, interesting and relevant, but many communicate better when read as part of the designated ensemble.  Generally, no one post will contain all the information (that I’ve written up and published) on any single organization or program, nor could any post contain enough of that basic information, I believe, to show both depth (drill-down Show-and-Tell) and discussion of where it fits in the larger networks of public agencies or entities (like State — State of Ohio, State of Florida, State of New York…) with private ones, fauna and flora varying from minuscule to nearly invisible to the naked eye, and “forces to be reckoned with” even for U.S. Presidents.

Among the “nearly invisible,” one has to distinguish sometimes those with bigger mouths (found testifying for more funding for “the cause” before state or U.S. legislatures, or their subcommittees), but below-zero budgets (as I round recently in Ohio: this DV entity, which my 2012 post had mentioned, managed to maintain a below-zero deficit from 2002 – 2015, but that didn’t stop the spokepersons (its leadership) from testifying, citing to the organization name each time.  My question was, why maintain a constantly over-spending and obviously not well-funded entity in the first place?)

Full title of that 2012 “…Reconceptualize This…” post, with shortlink ending “-101”ABA, APA, AFCC, AAML, . . and others:  Reconceptualize This!  [Some Ohio Councils, Commissions, and Headlines, Incl. Basic Links][Chosen to represent 2012 in my 2017 Retrospective, includes its own]

I’d pulled out the section beginning:

NOW LET’S LOOK AT SOME OF THIS PROGRESSIVE LANGUAGE CREEP AS FACILITATED BY CERTAIN ASSOCIATIONS (see subject of [the above] post)

and am keeping it separate, here, connecting a link, there.  THIS post with short-link ending “-5SR, ” is “Progressive Language Creep Section from 2012 “Reconceptualize This” post (reviewed and reformatted 2017)“] Completed Feb 14, 2017 (Valentine’s Day 🙂 ) but being one of perhaps 3 updates to the “Reconceptualize” post, there is a natural sequence in which should be published first, so I may delay another day or so. [published 2/19/2017]

…(and with two or three of its own 2017 offspring)

Two main themes (one regarding a program, another one person/ality and his related organizations under similar but not identical names) developed in this post have also been siphoned off to further develop them.  Marked in context when it comes up.

so that what remains here, each marked by a large heading will be:

(1) a substantial “Preview” and  (2) “2012 Contents, Formatted and Updated,” which represents the original 2012 contents (bottom under the Progressive Language Creep section), but with most formatting cleaned up and replacing some links no longer valid.  The preview contains more of my current understanding, the 2012 Contents (the rest of post) shows which organizations,  programs and their rhetoric had raised red flags back then.   I am still concerned about the same organizations, programs and their rhetorics (particularly as a woman and a mother), but it’s clear in reviewing the material I hadn’t fully migrated to “skip the debate on the rhetoric:  FIRST, show me the money, and the money behind the money, in terms of business registrations and tax returns !!!” Also, five years is a long time, and I’d researched (done “drill-downs”) on many organizations and tax-exempt foundations, as well as federal grants streams, since then.

“Progressive” in the title refers to “gradually, over time” which the post reviews in a year-by-year sampling of developments in the fields I blog, not to the political persuasion commonly though to be the polar opposite of “conservative.” The words “Language Creep” communicate the “gradually over time” sense well enough but in 2012 I’d added that word to intensify the meaning.

Anyhow, this update is now done, is now about 12,000 words (was originally closer to 6,000) and has some extra screenprints where former links were broken.

PREVIEW

This post ends looking at the American Humane Association historic involvement in the Child Protection Services without quite focusing on this on its main website, and the “QIC-NRF.”  (Screenprinted, added this 2010 reference) found at “CalSWEC.Berkeley.edu…/QIC-NRF…”

I’d blogged recently on CalSWEC for its promotion of some funky (shell-game, move the money among all 3) Ohio nonprofits in exactly this field as regional trainers, too).  That post link & title:

Searching “QIC-NRF,” there are plenty of results.  (next two images have links in their captions):

qic-nrf-google-search-showing-whos-reporting-on-it-feb15-2017-1pg

CLICK HERE FOR FULL-SIZED! QIC-NRF search Page 1 of 2 Google Search Results.  Youtube (image nr bottom) reveals connections btwn QIC-NRF participants (incl pilots) and existing recipients of other HHS Father-focused funding. NewDay Services also active in Access&Visitation grants (Tarrant County TX) as I recall: “Uploaded on May 26, 2011 Duane Yales tells his story and journey through the Child Welfare System. Duane was asked to represent Texas on the QIC-NRF National Father’s Advisory Council. NewDay Services for Children & Families was the local service provider for the project. Duane’s story has been a source of inspiration to child welfare workers to see fathers in a different light than they have traditionally seen them. This has led to better engagement with fathers, leading to better communication and better outcomes for the children. Category Nonprofits & Activism License Standard YouTube License”

qic-nrf-google-search-showing-whos-reporting-on-it-feb15-20174pm-1pg

CLICK HERE for FULL-SIZED! Page 2 of 2 Google Search results for “QIC-NRF” includes NACChildlaw, Fatherhood.gov, CBExpress (Children’s Bureau newsletter), DCCourts.gov and more

screen-shot-2017-02-14-at-2-47-49-pm

may not be full-page image. See CalSWEC.berkeley.edu link for the same.

screen-shot-2017-02-14-at-2-48-30-pm

From same document, same link (2010 report)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I chose the CalSWEC one and discovered internal consistencies, errors (in naming the supporting grant) and avoidance of naming the actual players and what was their various relationship (let alone dollar amounts) flowing among them through a common practice, though not a moral one, of speaking of a project or program as though it were a corporate person, i.e., with a life of its own to receive and disburse funds.

A Program =/= a Person (business entity).

This is subtle, but it cannot be unintentional, and it is a red flag (especially with other symptoms) of something “not quite right” about the situation, and typically involving a financial trail slated for derailment.  Otherwise, why not just tell the truth up front, and the first time, about who paid whom for what?
BRIEFLY, …..


[From an inside page] The National Quality Improvement Center on Non-Resident Fathers and the Child Welfare System (QIC-NRF) is a collaborative effort among the American Humane Association, the American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law and the National Fatherhood Initiative, and funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Children’s Bureau  [Image shown above]

This gets interesting — as the inside page is only referencing the QIC-NRF factor, but the cover page references QIC-NRF and ‘QIC-Child Welfare System” both.  Which is it?

So the National QIC-NRF is the “effort” or project, but it’s spoken of as if it’s the producer. or curriculum funder, on the face page, with no reference to the role of the HHS:


[From the cover page] Curriculum Funded by the National Quality Improvement Center on Non-Resident Fathers and the Child Welfare System
  

One moment it’s an entity, the next, a collaborative effort by 3 other entities (all nonprofits, the ABA a big one, the AHA, an old and generally respected one, and the NFI, while more controversial for its programming, having incorporated in 1994, has been influential and its programming is not entrenched within 1996 Welfare Reform and social services delivery systems through establishing grants administered by HHS, authorized under 1996 Welfare Reform.  As the HHS decides who gets these discretionary funds appropriated to it, I’d say HHS leadership (which in some years was closely entrenched with NFI leadership — do some homework, even Wikipedia, it will come up) is also a collaborator.

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Dialogue from 7/26/2011 post, charting HHS/OCSE Grants to States (CFDAs 93563, 93564)

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This post is 8,800 nearly 12,000 words with updates.  Updates are  a different-color — “seashell” — background, original material is normal (white) background.  Two extended update sections cover two major nonprofits (Center for American Policy and National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty, both in Washington, D.C.) and also demonstrate how I go about looking at and up a nonprofit tax return to locate who else it’s funding, how it’s funded, how old it is, and what potential influence it has on public policy, whether then or now.  
Both ones that showed up in this post, this time, happened to be “progressive” in outlook. They showed up when a writer working at one, whose bio blurb indicated she formerly worked at the other, made a statement about fatherhood funding as helping women.

This post shows what’s  being done with significant OCSE federal grants and should be of interest to every taxpayer.  There is a follow-up one (link also at the bottom) coming soon:

 Note:  The link will not be accessible until I publish that post.  It’s written, so that should be pretty soon after this one…

OK, I have a “mouth” and opened it to bring up another point, right before hitting “Publish” on this post. So now, we have 10,600 words, about 2,200 of them in THIS section, which I will also mark with a different background-color (I’ll call it “smoky-blue”)  for those who may wish to scroll below it and get to the subject matter referenced in the post title.

I HOPE (which is to be distinguished from actually believing) that people who currently are engrossed in journalistic reporting of custody disasters, however genuine and genuinely disturbing they are, may eventually wake up with a jolt (or any other way) and realize it’s time to do some catch-up homework on the money trail, as I have been doing for several years now.

Remember that Robert Frost poem about Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening? (co. 1923 & ff)  (“…miles to go before I sleep”) and “The Road Less Traveled” (“….and it has made all the difference”), called recently by a NYT Book Reviewer The Most Misread Poem in America (9/11/2015 by David Orr.  Odd subject matter for any Sept. 11 publication, in America).

Robert Frost in 1913 (from NYT Book Review Link attached)

I probably misread the poem also. So what?

I cited Robert Frost because the poems are familiar, and because I myself have been familiar with spending a lot of (my childhood actually) IN woods, both snowy and yellow (red, etc.) autumn  colors. It simply came to mind as expressing the situation.

But I do have miles to go, and see two paths diverging in reporting this subject matter.  And one path, the one I do follow, does seem less worn.

I don’t consider holding a minority point of view on certain issues being wrong when the majority point of view, in this case, summarized as “if we can JUST get major media coverage, THEN we will call attention to:

  • the federal funding (fatherhood.gov, formerly “Fatherhood.HHS.gov”) etc.) for propaganda, literally, against single mothers, as a social ill not to mention the A/V funding run through the child support system to help women lose contact with their children to violent or abusive men because of ‘co-parenting’ (and because social science “proves” — forget the current President of the USA and a WHOLE lot other exceptions to this demographic rule) that being raised without a father = allegedly being prepped for a life of crime, delinquency, premature sexuality, “multiple-partner-fertility” and retarded academic and economic status.

(Those who may think I’m exaggerating in the above summary probably haven’t waded through some of the verbiage!  Case in point, exposing what’s actually claimed to sunlight might do more to “dry it up” by revealing its  logically withered and humiliating state, than anything that could actually be SAID in response to such inane claims — made in the context, what’s more, of paid-for social science R&D run upon, particularly, low-income populations nationwide….)



Continuing with my list (and the sentence signifying a certain point of view about custody reform):

  • the private, conflict-of-interest, nonprofit trade (a) membership and (b) court-connected, ( c )  policy-influencing associations [501©3s] involving judges (AFCC et al.) and the fiscal behaviors of those running those associations  / corporations;
  • that the judiciary, courts, and government itself is as we speak being internationally aligned through leveraging of the tax-exempt sector (including family wealth housed in foundations) to the detriment of national sovereignty (let alone, “justice”), with a series of networked “centers” at specific public & private universities nationwide; {Footnote “##International”}
  • how federal funds are being POURED down holes where the “sun don’t shine” in multiple ways, one of which ways includes religious-exempt corporations who the IRS has to go through special hoops to audit, not to mention “take the money and run” nonprofits (small and large) and, when it comes to what I, as Let’s Get Honest, have been reporting most recently;
  • that the DV Cartel has for at least a decade (more likely, two) been joined at the hip — despite appearances to the contrary when “domestic violence awareness campaigns are being run — with the fathers’ rights group, which apparently have the lion’s share of the federal faucet).

“Yes, once we can get everyone’s attention through sensationalist and anecdoctal “tell-the-story” journalism on family court custody disasters, and his/hers debates on whether or not the abuse was real (i.e., parental alienation vs. domestic violence), THEN — someday in the lalaland future, NOT NOW — we can being a systematic exposition of the truth (as expressed in part, in some of the bulleted points above).

{Footnote ##International:  Read at least three-and-a-half pages, please!  This is an Oct. 2015 retrospective of articles published before and after WWII by a generation and group of writers who had ties with (London’s) Chatham House and the Royal Institute of International Affairs (RIIA) published in “International Affairs” as ”

The rise of the dual culture of world development and world government

 in International Affairs, 1930–1950, by  GIOVANNI FARESE

. . . To be clear, entirely new developments are taking place, ushering in a new era whose contours are still barely visible in the mist. [[SPEAKING OF NOW, i.e., OCT. 2015]]  An example is the birth of the BRICS’4 New Development Bank (NDB), including an emergency fund for stabilization (the Contingent Reserve Arrangement, or CRA), and that of the new Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) both led by China, by far their largest shareholder. It is a breach into the Bretton Woods System based on the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank. The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) and the Trans-Paci c Partnership (TTP) also signal global shifts. Moreover, the re-establishment of the United States–Cuba relationship opens a new chapter of engagement between former Cold War foes.5 Finally, the world will continue to get more connected as shown, for instance, by the MIR initiative for the development of transport and communication in the METR region (Middle East, Europe, Turkey and Russia) to boost social mobility and social welfare in the area, aiming at lowering extremism and proneness to conflicts.

Today, in the age of globalization, only joint solutions will work. We need multiple lenses: the historian’s, the economist’s, the jurist’s, the political scientist’s and the practitioner’s. This is why this virtual issue draws on different disciplines. …

The attempt here is to draw also on the practical culture of ‘men of deeds’, those who did not write scholarly papers, but who—in their capacities as bankers, diplomats, policy-makers—were at some point invited to present a paper at Chatham House (the London-based Royal Institute of International Affairs [RIIA], established in 1920).7 …


Ideas did not originate from a void then, nor can today. On the other hand, by presenting the authors and their ties with International Affairs, it also aims at showing the relevance of the journal, and of Chatham House, as a hub for the dissemination of this culture. It is, therefore, also a contri- bution to the history of Chatham House.

Articles, authors, affiliations: a generational and epistemic community

This virtual issue comprises 20 articles, written by 18 authors and published in International Affairs (IA) between 1931 and 1949. Eight were written before the Second World War, twelve after the war. Most of the articles stem directly from seminars held at Chatham House; ….With the exception of two, authors were all born between 1872 and 1900, so they all experienced the tragedy of two world wars. Some of them even fought in Europe during the First World War. All died, except two, between 1945 and 1985. A generational community thus emerges. The two world wars and the great depression of 1929–33 were major events that shaped their conscience—and lives, of course…..

We may want to focus only on the immediate, the local, and the recent.  While I can barely get people to talk about events in the last generation since PRWORA, a WHOLE lot of the US policy — and PARTICULARLY in fields involving “health and human services,” mental health and family structures — including the family court system, itself also a fairly recent creation — has been shaped by policy discussed in London and implemented in the UK.  In a sense, it’s a reclaiming of the United States as a policy-outpost of the former British empire, economically and practically if not legally. …

The next section references major US organizations, and universities from which many “experts” (on fatherhood, family structure, etc. catch my drift?) continue to receive public funding, publish and recommend there be (yet) more social science research and demonstration projects run on the populace, as a domestic “stock” and capital human resource — but we should ask, “WHOSE”??

(The rise of the dual culture of world development and world government

 in International Affairs, 1930–1950, by  GIOVANNI FARESE, continued)

Most of them had various links with their own national govern- ments (typically the Foreign O ce, while Beyen became Dutch Minister of Foreign A airs) or with international organizations (FAO, ILO, UNESCO[8] or other UN organizations). Some were rebuilders of western Europe, engaged in the implementation of the Marshall Plan (Finletter), or of the Common Market (Beyen). Despite their di ering views, they agreed that supranational orders could foster prosperity and security.

Interestingly, these men had ties not only with Chatham House but with a web of sister institutions, including the New York-based Council on Foreign Relations (CFR, established in 1921), the Honolulu-based Institute of Pacific Relations, (IPR, established in 1925), the Toronto-based Canadian Institute of International Relations (CIIR, established in 1928; today, Canadian International Council), and their journals Foreign Affairs, Pacific Affairs and International Journal.

A network of universities of global reach also emerges from the authors’ multiple ties (including Cambridge, Harvard, London School of Economics, Oxford, New York University, Princeton, Stanford, University College London, Yale). Notably, some of the authors joined larger intellectual circles as part of the global elite of past recipients of prestigious fellowships (Rhodes scholars, Rockefeller fellows).

Finally, though all authors here are men, links with prominent women—such as Marjory Allen and Eleanor Roosevelt—emerge.


8 The Food and Agriculture Organization, the International Labour Organization and the United Nations Educational, Scienti c and Cultural Organization, respectively.



That discussion may sound esoteric, academic, far away and long ago.  I ASSURE YOU, if you should start to investigate the CURRENT HHS funding relating to the subject matter of families (especially “child abuse prevention, family violence prevention, and fatherlessness as a solution to both, marriage promotion, etc.) and see some of the institutions (specifically, centers at universities) , as well as the AFCC’s international board of directors, emphasis on “Multidisciplinary professionals” and overt promotion of shared programming across country borders, specifically the USA’s northern border (into Canada) and “Across the Pond” with the UK, in addition to the habit of privatizing government services, redefining government services in terms of social science demographics and running (that is to say, “testing”) behavioral modification curriula on (us) at ALL ages and socioeconomic profiles (except the VERY richest elites), it will be much less “esoteric.”

I have not published, but I did learn more about the University College of London and how the British fund their university systems, this summer, in the context of learning that a USA “NIJ” (National Institute of Justice) had a message about their gradual strategic switch to “behavioral health” solutions to judicial problems .. and in the context of having heard about US Attorney General Loretta Lynch’s announcement that (the USDOJ, as I recall and specific cities) were joining the “Strong Cities Network,” based in London as it turns out.
(BACK TO THE BULLETED POINTS, BEFORE the QUOTATION ABOVE):
Specifically, while, ABC’s “20/20″ Footprints in the Snow” articles (links shown below), and arguing with 20/20 news outlets who them out, for being biased, withholding information, and in response, getting out the follow-up evidence,** I think may be exciting — but are not leading to a solution to the custody issues.  They are simply complaining, loudly about it.
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So, Who wrote the PBI-published Guide to Pennsylvania’s “New Child Custody Act”?

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Continued from my last post on, well, the publishing arm of the Pennsylvania Bar Association, and several topics. Part of being (who I am) is the tendency to Look Things Up. So, I started looking up those attorneys who helped explain the new custody law in Pennsylvania.

This 7,000 word post has a very detailed chart at the bottom (hard to produce, as to html) and has soaked up too much of my time (I am still typing in “html” compose mode, visually). I then probably made it a little worse by introductory prose paragraphs. BUT, I still maintain that it’s valuable information to consider — these points are not raised enough among parents. Feedback solicited (comments). One way to understand the post may be to FIRST scroll down to some of the charts (for a visual) then go back and read the explanations.

On the other hand, I don’t owe anyone anything on this matter. I did my own lookups, networking, collaboration, and beyond that — whatever gets posted is public service announcement. It’s not addressed to people who are comfortable with groupthink (on the courts), uninvolved or unconcerned about the significance of dysfunctional (etc.) courts on the country, or the presence about money-laundering possibilites that each such setup presents, or the undermining of representative government in favor of the therapeutic, over-diagnosing, medicating, institutionalizing, iatrogenic “Nanny State,” and not a very nice nanny, either.

Iatrogenic (from “Wikipedia” definition):

The term iatrogenesis means brought forth by a healer from the Greek ἰατρός (iatros, “healer”) and γένεσις (genesis, “origin”); as such, in its earlier forms, it could refer to good or bad effects. . . .The transfer of pathogens from the autopsy room to maternity patients, leading to shocking historical mortality rates of puerperal fever (a k a “childbed fever”) at maternity institutions in the 19th century, was a major iatrogenic catastrophe of that time. The infection mechanism was first identified by Ignaz Semmelweis.[2]

OK…

So, yes, Pennsylvania had a Custody Law Revamp passed in 2011

.

Jan. 2011 article (fairly substantial) in the Legal Intelligencer on the new custody law.
(more on how it happened, at bottom of this post). This post looks at a PBI release with many attorney authors (plus a single Judge, and some AFCC Psychologists, i.e., Arnold & Kasey Shienvold, Ph.D.’s) on the impact of the new custody law. See article for some issues it raises.


In fact, at the bottom of this post — something you probably won’t find anywhere else on the Internet — is a chart of the authors, with columns for “how AFCC ARE they?” and basic descriptors. While AFCC is hardly “The Skull & Bones” of Yale, it still is an association which many more judges and attorneys have adopted the mindset of, or may even be members of, without saying so on their website. In other words, its influences are felt – they are real — but not always mentioned directly.

While I did (or started) this for Pennsylvania — it really could and should be done for EVERY state as an ignorance-reducing movement for people who like to complain about judges, the courts, evaluators, GALs, etc. It has not been done (yet) for the primary reasons, as far as I can tell, is limited resources (i.e., you’re looking at a volunteer blogger, and family court veteran, which generally means, SOMETHING was stripped violently and suddenly (but in a process that still somehow manages to last for YEARS) out of one’s life — whether children, or assets // income, social support networks, or all of the above. So the people that are most motivated to report (or should be), are often least financially positioned to. (I’m working on it!).

And those who have funding, as nonprofits themselves, associating with other nonprofits for clout (just like AFCC does) and press, and a “day in the sun” — are less than motivated to examine the function of Nonprofits (per se) as a topic relevant to the family courts AT ALL. They too, would rather form coalitions and self-selecting groupings to run conferences, publish, attract followers, and proclaim theories.

RELEVANCE of answering the “How AFCC ARE they?“: Membership in AFCC, or agreement with and repeated references to its standards are throughout the family law system — yet the organization has been at many levels functioning as a monopoly (while private in association, conferencing, funding, etc.) trade association among my PUBLIC employees. It has a definite mindset towards matters which tend to bring custody cases to the courts to start with — domestic violence and child abuse, in particular. Or, co-parenting when there has been DV or CA. And yet the organization — for all its own self-promotion, dramatic conferences with flashy brochures — is under-reported in the MSM press, and is scarcely mentioned !!! by advocates involved in the stopping domestic violence and child abuse industry.

As such, few people have even ruffled their feathers, or disturbed the seas on which they operate, let alone questioned the practices AS an organization. VERY few, although definitely some have. And yet this organization — and the others that work under, or with it (much of my blog names and describes them, specifically) — is able to operate with more influence and less accountability by virtue of it being “under the radar” of people who need to know MOST about it — which is 1. parents, and 2. all taxpayers.
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GALs Gone Wild — and Overbilling, Under-reporting Income (Connecticut, Minnesota, Pennsylvania)

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The title reference will be obvious to some cultures, think “Spring Break” and TV programs you’d rather not have your nine-year-olds watching. It seemed appropriate as to quality of behavior.

In context, the discussion (recently) has been on Children’s Advocacy Groups — of which “guardians ad litem” are part. Is there a way to see the impact (emotion) without losing reason to emotion, particularly when harm to children is involved?

This is a shorter post (I’m not putting much time into it); just wanted to place the three cases in question alongside (after) the National Association of Counsel For Children’s self-descriptions of just how often they want an attorney in the life of a child (or juvenile). That this organization has developed a certfication process, has an expanding membership, has member affiliates, Children’s Law Office Program guides, and more — and that it had HHS support in developing child welfare law as a certification specialty (since the US IS trafficking kids, might as well has some standards…??)

In general, we are finding that when women or children attempt to separate from abuse, for their safety, here comes some facet (usually of the court, or government agency), talking about “Children’s Rights” (to both parents, regardless of quality.  Which is then used improperly to completely cut off contact, often with the noncriminal parent, and often & suddenly, with the natural mother of the children.  Sometimes this then leads to foster care, or sometimes it leads to extended custody battles, which are very profitable for this arm of the government (courts) and those doing business with them.  Just not for the “Children” in whose name all this was done.

In the case of these “GALs gone wild” — In at least two of the cases, there’s evidence of over-billings (Connecticut, Pennsylvania) and allegations (the GAL will have to stand trial) of under-reporting income. Both, by a LOT. That’s what’s really gone wild. In my opinion, it’s possible to have gone wild because systems of control and tracking of payments is simply not in place — nor is there any sense by the public (really) that it’s their job (with or without having children or being in the custody courts) to actually understand whether or not their local governments are using their funds honestly.
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“Finding Ground Zero in Connecticut,” the Underground Economy in an AFCC Courthouse?

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[THIS POST has been expanded and revised to about 6,000 words, much of it quotes, and has a feedback form. It links to two groundbreaking “Washington Times/Communities” articles on very disturbing custody cases; what’s groundbreaking is the angle of approach, and type of evidence posted. This post begins referencing TANF, because “TANF” funding is often operative in such cases. And it posts a comment on one of them I couldn’t get posted over at the WT.

My post explains “AFCC Courthouse” (my generic term) in some detail. In this Connecticut case, “AFCC Courthouse” refers to the “Regional Family Trial Docket” in Middletown Connecticut presided over by a certain judge. However the term in general refers to the nonprofit organization (AFCC) started in Los Angeles County [at least, they claim exactly, i.e., 1963] five decades ago, which has a tendency to set up specialized courts, once its judges (membership) are in charge of a family division, or in positions of influence to do so. I forgot to mention, that in its early years, it also incorporated in a variety of states, changed its corporate name (and EIN#) several times, and probably is not properly registered as a nonprofit to this day in all states and territories where it operates (most likely, all 50 + territories). See early newsletters at bottom of my blog. AFCC runs conferences, trains its membership and others, and lobbies for legislative and administrative changes in the way divorce, custody, and dependency law works. Hence calling a certain docket an “AFCC Courthouse” is often very accurate shorthand for that particular courthouse, or docket.

This post was, however, to also publish my comment which didn’t make it onto the Washington Times comments field, for unknown reasons, and for further reference to interested readers. Last I looked, only one of my very generic (nothing specific) comments was cleared. AFter technical difficulties and over three days, I decided to bring my response over here to the blog.

Although I believe the blog makes this plain, FYI I am a survivor of not this type of case (mine involved DV not identified or reported child molestation) and know how devastating it is. I also network with people who believe that the key to this is the money trail, not the harm done the children, which we believe is more likely just collateral involved in extracting the maximum $$ (public and private) through this abusive system of handling such matters. If this subject matter interests you, a contact and feedback form is on the post. (I would’ve added them earlier, had I noticed the widget available on wordpress!)]]


The Time is NOW to Speak Out regarding TANF (Temporary Assistance to Needy Families) Extension!

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Exposing and Prosecuting Judicial Corruption through Common Law Discovery (1997 Interview)

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A Few FAQs on Major Family Court Programs (NYEve 2012 Reflex on the Gender Gap)

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(Written the last day of 2012) This post is about 10,000 words and was edited supplemented several times after publishing [INCLUDING IN 2014, when I was formatting a Table of Contents] .
FYI, that’s typical of my blogging… Also thanks for patience with formatting, as I deal with a different input device and fewer “buttons.” It’s cumbersome, only lets me compose in HTML mode..) [extra horizontal lines may appear as forced “paragraph breaks” which otherwise, get erased.

I am, to tell the truth, having an awful day, struggling with computer issues, web access, and, apart from the electronic struggles, with grief.

Also the long-term effects of chronic, for lack of a better term, Family Violence — in its ugly, needless, heartless, dishonest, deceitful and extortionist self. People reach a limit, and because I am NOT of the inclination to behave like those who have a conflict with me — i.e., my faith doesn’t endorse the criminal behavior part — I am finding it just this much family violence, all this just too much.

Normally this article wouldn’t be much of my concern — it’s talking about “Wage Gaps in MBA Programs” — I mean, a woman that has got through an MBA program is not likely facing the same issues I have been.

But from my perspective (year after year, there has been a return to literally begging status around the court fiascos, which is hardly unintentional from a systems, or my ex’s part; I’d been promised before separation that he knew how to get out of paying child support (wonder where learned it from….), but well, I just didn’t know at the outset of the program how many other parties profit from this. In fact I didn’t know til I revisited Liz Richards’ NAFCJ.net site and worked through the basics — almost no one else at the time was talking about the grants incentives…..


So what happens when WAGE GAP is multiplied by REPEATED WAGE DISRUPTIONS AND DECREASES (when an employee has to miss too much work, move for safety, return to court to try to contact one’s kids — often — deals with stalking and has to re-arrange work life for protection from it, has to take into account client/employer safety in future business dealings, and word gets around that the individual has “family problems” which interfere with work problems, and that’s chronic? The main concept behind having a sustainable work life is that it’s sustained. Or moves are strategic, or for exploring different options?


So, look at this from SFGATE.com (San Francisco on-line, it was also in the print edition, page A1):

MBA Wage Gap between Men, Women Grows” Dec. 29, 2012

[Alison Damast is a Bloomberg Businessweek reporter. E-mail: adamast@bloomberg.net] Ten years ago, the wage gap between men and women graduating from top MBA programs appeared to have been nearly erased. {{that’s astounding, considering the rest of society..}} That suggested that women would launch their careers on an equal footing with men and then experience a gender-blind sprint up the corporate ranks. A decade later [i.e., NOW], a far more sober picture is emerging: The pay gap among graduates of elite business schools is widening, according to new research from Businessweek’s biennial survey of MBA graduates. On average, female grads from top MBA programs now earn 93 cents for every dollar paid their male classmates.

{{that still didn’t grab my attention. At least they are working!!}}

At about a third of the top 30 U.S. business schools, women earn less than men – sometimes considerably less. Female MBA graduates from the class of 2012 at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, for instance, earned 86 percent of male wages, while those at Stanford Graduate School of Business earned 79 percent.

{{Now, that has my attention. (I’m also remembering that Catherine Austin Fitts attended Wharton. Of course she had a lot of other things going for her personally as well, I saw some MIT in the background, time in China — she’s no slouch…)…Two more short sections of this article here:}}

“The gap numbers at the beginning are not very large and can be mostly accounted for by differences in grades, course selection and the fields people are starting in,” says Marianne Bertrand, an economics professor at University of Chicago Booth School of Business, citing results of studies on compensation among female MBA graduates from her school.

What is much more striking is how much that gap grows over time.The pay gap is especially wide for women heading to finance jobs.

A study of 2010 census data by Bloomberg found that among the six categories with the largest gender gap in pay were insurance agents, personal advisers and securities sales agents.

Women in those jobs earned 55 to 62 cents for every $1 men pulled in, the census data showed.

In 2010, research from Catalyst, a nonprofit group that focuses on expanding opportunities for women in business, found that female MBAs were being paid, on average, $4,600 less in their first job than men, a disparity that grows to $30,000 by mid-career, says Anna Beninger, a senior associate in Catalyst’s research department.

{{Add to this the fact that the dollar is hardly stable, you can imagine it makes an increasing difference!}}

Even women placed in high-potential leadership development programs often miss out on what are considered hot jobs, or projects most critical to career advancement, Catalyst found. Says Beninger: “Women’s careers lag behind men from day one.” . . . .

[Alison Damast is a Bloomberg Businessweek reporter. E-mail: adamast@bloomberg.net]

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