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Revisiting and Remembering National NOW’s “Six Core Issues,” Like Number Two: “Ending Violence Against Women,’ vis-a-vis How Far Down A. Domestic Violence and B. “The Family Court Crisis” Are Buried.. and Several NOW IRS Forms 990 [April 28, 2022].

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I was curious whether “NOW” is no longer a force to be reckoned with for women’s rights, despite some high-profile individuals involved with NOW criticizing others who aren’t doing what they haven’t, yet, either.  (See previous post, link below).

What I found at apps.IRS.gov/app/eos/: (“EOS” for “Exempt Organizations Search”): many scattered and (for the most part) small tax-exempt chapters and national IRS filings. Many were IRS-auto-revoked, and some seem to have stopped filing altogether (they may be extinct, maybe not). The generic search brought up 425 results, so I narrowed it down to those who had Forms 990 copies. Of these, based on a name-search at Candid.org’s “Research and Verify Nonprofits 990-finder,” which displays total  assets (note: not revenues) in a table, not one was significantly large.

NOW national isn’t that big compared to other influential foundations.  (I cannot speak to the collective impact of the grassroots). Tax returns (with active links) are posted to several NOW entities below.

Again, the context of this post was from the previous one on who gets appointed to DV Task Forces, and how “feminist” are they (or, are they not, in the final analysis).

Caution in interpreting the numbers: Total (gross) Assets at Candid.org or anywhere else is not a reflection of how much revenue is processed through any nonprofit, but, I saw nothing recent over $5,000,000 — and we have billion-dollar tax-exempt foundations with their hand in the family courts, domestic violence/child-abuse-prevention, diversionary justice, juvenile justice reform, etc. field, as well as other domestic violence resource network organizations (so to speak) funded by both HHS and DOJ federally, well over $10,000,000 revenues annually (two examples:  NCJFCJ in Nevada and Futures Without Violence in California, which controls real estate and was as I recall over $40M revenues at one point. These organizations also trade funds among each other, i.e., sub-grant or pass-through to each other.. I didn’t check just this moment but in New York, I imagine that Vera Institute of Justice would also be quite large.** Of course NOW isn’t running shelters, it has a different purpose, but still, I wasn’t too surprised to see that its not showing up financially as a major factor player. It may be politically, but doesn’t seem to be financially..)


**Just before publishing, I took a quick look a VERA’s financials from CharitiesNYS.com; I’ve looked at these and the organization before; the size is truly stunning, as well as how it takes most of those (primarily)government grants and (based on the latest return, FY2020/YEJune as I recall, not signed til May, 2021) and turns them into over $100M of subcontracts.  It’s simply huge.  I decided, though, this deserves a separate post.  IF you’re curious, I’ll upload the pdf here:  Note one pdf has three forms in a row:  CHAR500 (which is great: It gives not only which govt agencies fund, but also the amounts.  It took more than a page to list them all), followed by the tax return (Form990), followed by the financial statements.
The Notes and other details say it’s also spun off (“Subsequent events” after the fiscal year end) a “Project Guardianship” where it’s functioning as public guardian for elderly and disabled, to manage their assets.  The amount seems to be $35,000,000 worth.  I also noted, out of all the pages that were inserted right-side-up, the ones that were somehow fed into the scanner upside down included several pages of grants (Schedule I), and several (not all) the actual financial statements.  In fact, I need to turn them all rightside up before uploading a pdf, so “maybe later.”

Looking for these also brings up — any search does — even more database issues (separate from any organization/entity filing issues). This comes with privatization, i.e., private ownership and administrations of such data, this time (again), with Candid.org which grabs tax returns from the IRS and posts them.

“Candid”has a user interface to search for these by entity name — which it gets wrong so often, I wonder whether they are manually entered, or what…so you must use EIN# with it for halfway reasonable search results ,and correct for errors, repeat the search, and pay attention to what does or doesn’t surface with each filter applied.  It has other benefits (presentation in columns, some ability to track earlier tax returns through url tweaks, something the IRS database doesn’t seem to have.

In searching for all these NOW entities on Candid the other day, I noticed you cannot enter more than one, distinct EIN# per search.  Why not?  That would seem to be one of the most basic standards of a user interface.  But no, you must repeat, repeat, and repeat again.  It’s free, but horribly inefficient!

This post is:

Revisiting and Remembering National N.O.W.’s “Six Core Issues,” Like Number Two: “Ending Violence Against Women” vis-a-vis How Far Down: A. Domestic Violence and B. ‘The Family Court Crisis’ Are Buried.. with Several NOW IRS Forms 990 [April 28, 2022]. (short-link ends “-eot” and middle character is a lower-case “o” as in “oh, my!”). About 6,000 words.

Like many (if not most) of my posts, it arose from another one just published:

Table Talk’ Helps You Quickly Analyze Any Task Force*, Council, Commission, etc. (*Here, New York’s Task Force for a COVID-19 DV Response): Add Columns for Entity/Non-Entity, Website, Legal Domicile, and (For Size/Operations), Even For Some EIN#s, to Find AND read Any Tax Returns [Publ. Apr. 26, 2022].. (short-link ends “-egn”)

In it, I’d quoted New York City NOW on the New York (State) Council on Women and Girls’ Melissa DeRosa (you can’t miss it — the two largest images on my post, or link on the caption, below).

and on its disgraced former Governor Andrew Cuomo,  so I decided to review and post some of the NOW national, and city basic information, in a quick overview.

It’s good to know when reading output in major media citing to any nonprofit, what its financials show — and if they’re showing on its website. I also look at NOW (National’s) Six Core Issues...

Disclaimer:

This is not that detailed a drill-down; I wanted to take a look, and publish what I’d seen so far. There’s more that could be done (and should), but not my research and writing priority, or interest, at this time.  This post may however be interesting to some to see why I stand where I do in not holding my breath for help from these sources.

Some posts come out in one, almost nonstop session. This one did:  I knew what I wanted to say and how much I decided might be helpful to show (not just “say”), resulting in some quotes, and several more tables with the last three years of tax returns. That’s this post.


In quoting what an entity says about itself, why shouldn’t I quote both its own websites and (once found — NOW entities seem to specialize, like many in the DV infrastructure, in NOT volunteering their EIN#s or uploading sufficient financials) its own tax return and transparency habits?

For when those financials or EIN#s aren’t posted on entity websites, New York State’s charities search site is quite helpful, and it has a business entities search site also.  Add to that what the IRS may have (that CharitiesNYS.com doesn’t already) and it’s a good start. For anyone also exploring more of the New York State COVID-19 DV Response Task Force (appointed May, 2020; its chair resigned in disgrace August, 2021), that link will help.  Many members, obviously, might be and were on New York non-profit entities.

This post states where I stand as a feminist — I still believe I am — who didn’t sign on the line for this agenda, but whether or not I ever did, regardless of the reasons I did not, this post illustrates that, and possibly why help is NOT coming from this quarter as to, specifically, abuse of women as women and as mothers who’ve already dealt with domestic violence through/by way of, the family court system.

Listen to the organizations spell it out in their own words!

It’s not a right/left dilemma politically.  Yes, the DV infrastructure (and certainly NOW) leans to the Left, but that doesn’t mean it’s above throwing innocent people, particularly mothers who may not be “full-on” with NOW’s list of issues, in the middle of a highway with federal-grants-laden state and federal buses speeding and aiming right at them, but fails to even sound an alert. Targeting us, when we have children, it’s going to hurt our children — the next generations many of us gave birth to, and still hope to see a future for. The states want us “out of the way” so as to do its system-change, societal realignment and infrastructure capacity-building, and be complimented for it too.

NOW had positioning, it had opportunity, and it has certainly had the information timely.  It just wasn’t interested…. I’ve been a witness.

I think at the end of the day, we (in the “demographic” I mention above and will spell out later in the post (fine print, though) — and other than being a woman, I don’t fit any — not one — of those demographics that seem to interest N.O.W., although for a season it** seemed to show some interest in what was going down in the family court systems — are going to have to help ourselves, whether individually or in clusters through networking.

**I should refer to a single organization as an “it” not a “they.”  Here, there are several entities at the national level, and chapters, but still as entities, I’ll say “it” not “they” to keep this in mind.

What “we are going to have to help ourselves,” means when obstacles such as internet access, or internet/media platform screening algorithms impede connecting, and being often separated geographically,^^ we can’t spend all our time processing others’ information and trying to “get on the same page.” That’s the corporate world:  collectivism, and the lowest common denominator (I’m talking, of information) rises to the top.  Energy spent seeking with whom to collaborate can be redirected, and perhaps should be.

(^^Elon Musk just made a deal to buy Twitter: it’s going private, did you hear?  It’s already got algorithms warning people away from my (fairly innocent!) account, and I have yet to see any explanation why the numbers are so low with how much information I put out…  I shudder to think what it might mean… that a man who believes he’s preserving mankind’s future by looking to colonize other worlds through space, and who obviously has talent and creativity … but, there has also been coverage of how he treats the women he decides to have children with; extreme control, and deviously so.  I wouldn’t expect much less at the helm of Twitter, and I for one, appreciate SEC reports as a source of information on PUBLIC-traded companies…

BELOW here is everything I wrote earlier on the topics mentioned in the post title. Taking the content here lets me publish the related “Table Talk on Task Forces” (short-link ends “-egn”), which is was my goal (it was published 4/26)..

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Size Still Matters — So, How to Assess Who’s Got the Biggest (Most) Assets, Where Are They Stored, Who Manages the Most of OTHERs’ Assets (AUM), How Much are Americans Bankrolling Both, or Should We Be Measuring Something Else? [Started 8/24, Published 10/8/2017.]

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Post title: Size Still Matters — So, Who’s Got the Biggest (Most) Assets, Who Manages the Most of OTHERs’ Assets (AUM), How Much are Americans Bankrolling Both, or Should We Be Measuring Something Else, like Donations? [Started 8/24, Published 10/8/2017]  (case-sensitive short-link ends “-7up”)

This short, informative, and I admit at times flippant post still makes its points about distinguishing size of entities and ones that seek to present themselves as smaller (or larger) than they actually are. I also was going through some of the definitions of “syndicate” in reference to topics I was more focused on in August, 2017 (Tobacco-RICO-related), than I have been in September 2017. Those comments are on: Basic Definitions and Etymology (Roots) of the word ~syndicate. Syndicates can be formed for legal OR illegal purposes. Know the Difference! (8/26/2017, published Oct. 3) [short-link ends “-7vi”]

Still, with persistence, I find that topics covered in one context tend to come up in others, too. Some of these revelations (to me at least) continue to astound as to the casual tossing around of millions, or sometimes billions, of dollars from a given entity towards the cause, and from there to subcontractors, grantees, while being retained — or lost — as reflected on the corresponding huge and sometimes rapidly fluctuating, but always illuminating balance sheets of each entity.

Take for example the American Legacy Foundation later renamed “Truth Initiative Foundation(™).”

The post title, and this post, came from my feeling I should qualify the statement that the American Legacy Foundation (total gross assets around one billion, only formed in 1999, too) as being “monster-sized.”  Obviously, with Robert Wood Johnson Foundation being ten times its size (and involved in some of the same projects) — or a center under the CDC which involved a tobacco-cessation nonprofit I was writing about (because it was among the USDOJ Intervenors in the RICO Case against Phillip Morris et. al…) which referenced this nonprofit — that center’s 2016 budget was $1.17 Billion, I learned — size is still “all relative” (only meaningful in comparison to other entities or some outside standard).  (where it started, ca. August 29, 2017)

After publishing the post, on reviewing it more, I saw and decided to label its three basic sections, which may help people understand why those particular organizations.  American Legacy Foundation (first section) relates to the ongoing recent blog themes re: big tobacco litigations as it intersects with HHS and agencies under it.  The second and third sections below are:

  • 2nd section: CENIC (Corp. for Educ. Network in Calif.) & CITY OF HOPE
    • For non-Californians:  other states surely have parallel organizations, and City of Hope typifies what comprises a major healthcare operation, with its component parts as shown on their financial statements.  The takeaway here is, ALWAYS check for tax returns, but realize because of the networking, individual tax returns are rarely the whole story.
  • 3rd section: Forbes’ 50 Largest Foundations 2016 and its #2 Charity: The Task Force for Global Health & Related /Similar Orgs. associated w/ Emory University in Georgia.
    • Take-away here includes the tendency of organizations that get big — often from public funds but not always — to form spinoff entities in later years, often on the exact same website.
    • Emory University anchoring both Task Force for Global Health and (see that section) the famous “Carter Center” (named after former President Jimmy Carter and his wife) in effect clouds the types of in-kind medication donations, and in the latter case, millions every year targeted specifically to sub-Saharan Africa through the spin-off entity.
    • Not reported here — but I will post: I found through looking at board members, another small but still “iffy” set of nonprofits run by an Emory University business (not Public Health) professor. From what the tax returns are telling me, this is a legitimate professor using tax-exemption for illegitimate purposes (i.e., simply paying less taxes, write-offs, etc.).  That’s not what academic privileges are for, and has me even more curious about what else is going on in Georgia, and at this institution.
    • Organizations also tend to copy each other’s behavior.

I believe all the topics are interesting in their own right, but as usual and as ever, am still promoting individual initiatives to look up and look at foundations, charities, and of course the direction of government programming (especially under HHS) over time. I found that even turning away for just a period — a year, a half year, two years — major developments that are NOT typically referenced in the mainstream media, OR the “alternate” media supposedly correcting mainstream (“alt-right” or “far left,” “progressive”), although once you start looking some of the big ones up, the connection to MSM and headline news will become more and more regular.


AMERICAN LEGACY FOUNDATION SECTION:

American Legacy Foundation funds as I recall came from the MSA Tobacco Litigation settlements, a process which had been driven by some of the organizations mentioned in the (see next link) post, which in part was also pushing for major HHS/NIH (Nat’l Institutes of Health) expansion especially for biomedical research, also for cancer.

My August 5, 2017 post (ca 15,500 words) has many details, images and documentations.  I was studying some of the background of key organizations and of the related (driven by some of the same major players in this field) NIH funding expansions…because Congress appropriates the HHS (NIH is under HHS) funds, when I say “driven by,” I’m talking here about the ability of well-connected people and their well-funded organizations to influence Congress and specifically here regarding smoking cessation efforts on the basis of smoking causing cancer.

An Alternate Viewpoint on the Anti-Smoking / Smoking Causes Cancer! Campaign and its Syndicated (?) Backers incl. the Whiteheads, the Laskers, the NIH and the U.S. Congress (from SmokersHistory.com and Other Sources. See also Tobacco Lawsuits and 1998 MSA Settlement Funds ~~} American Legacy Foundation, now the so-called Truth Initiative®) (post started 7/31, published 8/5/2017) with case-sensitive short-link ending “-7na” 

(Check out the closing paragraphs on the “Alternate Viewpoint” post…)

For a general “size” point of reference, I showed that back in 2002, the “ALF” managed to lose $35M by selling over $8B of securities — but then again, it also earned $54M** $16M from dividends and interest the same year.  Then again, it spent $91.7M on “Other expenses” per its tax returns, of which (says the Form 990 detail) most ($87M) went to “Contract Services”.”  The other major chunk of expenses that year were $32M of grants, the delegation of most ($27M) of them being presented at least as uploaded to the databse which gets them from the IRS, in virtually illegible form.  Of another $4.2M (of those $32M) grants under the “sponsorship” category, the largest chunk went, unsurprisingly given the subject matter, straight to UCSF ($3.3M as I recall). Here’s that tax return, all of it, in pdf format:

American Legacy Fndtn (Tobacco MSA grants est 1998) FY2002 Sold 8’5B investmts at a 53M Loss (!!) 911956621_200306_990 (all pp, ptd 7-30-2017)

**correction — double-checking the $54M quote, I see that referred to “unrealized gains” part of the return, not shown on Page 1 summary.  This would’ve been shown in the financial statements.  On the other hand, $54M of the $91M (“Other expenses) that year was shown going to a single contractor in Boston “Arnold Communications.”

Three images from within the FY2002 return and one from FY2003 showing a $46.8M gain from sale of securities..  Which securities, one wonders!  Who is donating $8B worth of securities over such a short period (or possibly even within a single year).

 

ALF 2002 details some of the “sponsorship” grants — showing ca. ¾ ($3.3M of $4.2M) went to UCSF.

ALF FY2002 detail from a listing of $27M grants to others had been shrunk to below visibility, in explicably… and the entity is at this point only a few years old…

ALF FY2002, $87M in “Contract Services” is major “Other Expense” of $91M total.

American Legacy Fndtn FY2003, prior yr lost $35M selling over 8B assets; this year somehow they profited $46M. Where that many assets came from, I still don’t see reflected on tax returns.

 

The numbers we are dealing with over time are, by a normal person’s standards (supporting self, family, maybe contribution to charities, or saving for retirement, helping/hoping to send children to a decent college) are phenomenal — millions, hundreds of millions (regularly) and billions.  Plural.

But within these there are still degrees of relative size, there are types of donations (for example, in one example below — actually two — among the $100M+donations (or close to it some years) of donations, were in-kind donations of drugs, medications and related inventories for use in, (Carter Center Collaborative, Inc.) primarily sub-Saharan Africa.

Another issue that came up as I looked for some of the “50 largest foundations” on different lists, besides how they were categorized, is what are actually membership dues (contributions, technically speaking) are classified on the Form 990s as “Program service Revenues” in one place, and contributions (same organization) in another.  Also, in looking for “the largest” for some list — for example, Forbes had one — this often doesn’t take into account related organizations, which consideration of the tax returns would quickly show.

Here’s “American Legacy Foundation” (“Truth Initiative”) tax returns from that post:

ORGANIZATION NAME ST YR FORM PP TOTAL ASSETS EIN
American Legacy Foundation DC 2016 990 65 $957,381,718.00 91-1956621
American Legacy Foundation DC 2015 990 92 $1,096,789,302.00 91-1956621
American Legacy Foundation DC 2014 990 97 $1,151,506,314.00 91-1956621

It’s hovering around $1B assets (Gross) now — but it had its hands on much more a dozen-plus years ago.  See also my post published 8/19/2017 (continuation of this one) which may have more detail.  I looked at this again recently, took more “screenprints” and am considering posting a separate page just on that year’s return, to emphasize — what’s really going on there?  Why should the public be funding such an operation?
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