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Archive for August 1st, 2016

Family Counseling for De-Radicalization Programs/Home Base, Germany? Daniel Koehler (Princeton/Free University Berlin) has a Grreat new Market Niche and References, courtesy 2015-formed “Center for Cyber and Homeland Security” (post published 8-1-2016)

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This post goes with my recent “Munich /  Strong Cities Network” which, after the “PREVIEW” stating some of my main concerns and reasons for posting, starts with some articles  and maps on the Syrian migration crisis and Germany’s leadership response to it.  (“Munich” as symbolic for recent terrorist events in Germany AND France).

 

In which a young man like this….
has a program to save (de-radicalize) young men like this…It’s too late for the one with the beard — this young Canadian-born Muslim convert man died fighting for Isis.


 

 

 

 

 

 

I just read, and sometimes when I read, I smell something familiar.  I smelled it on the first read-through of a certain address and bookmarked it mentally (and on wordpress).  The terms were unfamiliar to me, and it took (not too) long to figure out where they fit together — who goes with whom, and WHICH nonprofit was running the training curricular for behavioral modification programming aimed at the family level.

Terms such as BAMF, “GIRDS,” HAYAK, “Mothers for Life” and so forth make more sense when we have located them in geography (GIRDS didn’t make that too easy), type of entity (GIRDS website doesn’t self-identify, but others citing it do — it’s a German nonprofit) and in time, i.e., when was it started — not to mention, and personality / by whom.

Hayak Canada may have been a group, but as their GoFundMe and “Launchpad” didn’t really get off the ground, it looks like the Hayak (Canada) founder is staff on GIRDS.

BAMF — still working on this one — was a government institution also in Germany.

Eventually I came to this Center and underneath it — note, it doesn’t seem to show through cellphone, only from computers, and when viewed on computers, will be tab with a drop-down menu on the top banner, and it is from that drop-down menu that I was able to view “SENIOR FELLOWS.”

(website at GWU)

 

For a few bonus points (information learned), Koehler is a Fellow over at the GWU “Center for Cyber & Homeland Security” — with out of 10 FELLOWS, only 3 women, and only 1 from the USA (as to college).

After writing this and part of the next post, I found that yes there is a connection between Daniel Koehler, the young man to left, above as an expert CVE (Countering Violent Extremism) and the Strong Cities Network.  This was advertised at a Brookings Institution meeting back in November, 2015.  It took quite a bit of hunting to find this documentation — it’s not exactly showing at the front door of the organizations involved:

http://www.brookings.edu/events/2015/11/09-countering-violent-extremism-intervention (This link mentions Daniel Koehler, below, in passing as a family counselor at a German “Hayat” — and while mentioning GWU’s “Program on Violent Extremism” doesn’t really show his US background (Princeton) and involvement with Candians (Christiane Boudreau). This Nov. 2015 predates by about a MONTH the formation of GWU’s “Center for Cyber & Homeland Security” (and under there, “Program on Violent Extremism.” He is currently among 10 “Senior Fellows” there…

Let’s look at what that Nov. 9 “EVENT” link at BROOKINGS actually says:

The Islamic State’s recruitment of foreign fighters has thrust the debate over how to counter violent extremism (CVE) onto the center of domestic and international security agendas. How might nonconventional methods of early intervention such as counseling, education, and community building better prepare governments and communities for the CVE challenge?

I am finding, in my readings, that no matter what the subject matter “PROBLEM” is, certain sectors are going to push the same type of solutions.  The TIMING of this one precedes by one month the creation of GWU’s “CCHS” (see this post) and references featuring Daniel Koehler, who I mentioned in passing in the MUNICH post.  Altthough the Program on Extremism is mentioned, that Daniel Koehler is a “Senior Fellow” there (if he was at the time) or had any connection to it at the time, is NOT mentioned.  See also that “Institute for Strategic Dialogue” ?

That institute is based in London and is from where the Strong Cities Network is basically run — but does this BROOKINGS EVENT (abstract) mention this?  NO!.

On November 9, the Project on U.S. Relations with the Islamic World, in conjunction with the George Washington University’s Program on Extremism and the Institute for Strategic Dialogue, hosted a panel of experts to discuss the causes and possible solutions to violent extremism. The panel featured Lorsenzo Vidino, director of the GWU’s Program on Extremism, whose work focuses mainly on developing policy solutions to violent extremism in the United States. The panel also featured Daniel Koehler, who has served as a counselor for Hayat, a German intervention program that helps families prevent relatives from engaging in violent extremism; Rashad Ali, who is trained in Islamic theology and jurisprudence, a former member of Hizb ut-Tahrir, and has worked on de-radicalization initiatives in prison, probation, and community settings in the United Kingdom for over five years; and Angela King, deputy director of U.S.-based Life After Hate, and co-founder of its Exit USA program, which supports individuals leaving far-right organizations and educates communities about root causes of violent extremism. Brookings Fellow Will McCants moderated the discussion.

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Written by Let's Get Honest

August 1, 2016 at 9:02 pm

Posted in 1996 TANF PRWORA (cat. added 11/2011)

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