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Archive for March 29th, 2016

Re: My June 4, 2011 Post on Four Special Issue Resource Centers (Ellen Pence/MPDI): (Pt 2 of, well, now it’s 3), “Same text, better formatting, some updating”).

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Before digging into this post, click on this “TinyURL” which leads to a report generated by the “new face” of TAGGS.HHS.Gov.  This is some of the subject matter I am discussing.   That link leads to a a report run today (3/29/2016) showing by year, grants to a single organization in (Duluth) MN:

Recipient Name: DOMESTIC ABUSE INTERVENTION PROGRAMS
Report Total:  $23,841,530 [= 2016 search results; about $3.8M higher than my post in 2011]
Distinct Award Count: 38

You will notice that some grants refer to the “Special Issue Resource Center.” …

Given the column headings I selected, that of over perhaps twenty years, only THREE different women are shown:   Ellen Pence and Denise Gamache headed up most of them as “Principal Investigator”, then in about 2000, mostly just Denise Gamache, and in 2016, I see a “Renee Gutman.”

Denise Gamache is now associated with “Battered Women’s Justice Project” (and was while working also at DAIP) which decided to “come out” (incorporate in MN) in the year 2013.  I see that “Renee Gutmann” got her degree in 1993, and has worked for DAIP since 1993 (LinkedIn) and is characterized as “Accountant” for DAIP.


Part 1 (most recent post) explains why I’m re-blogging it with some updates. It was recently reblogged on Red Herring Alert, in an interesting juxtaposition of articles.

This version of the same post makes some charts more readable. The gist of the material is the Ellen Pence / Casey Gwinn connection (representing the Duluth, MN-based “DAIP” as it now goes by, and the Family Justice Center concept (now called “Alliance for Hope International” as a California nonprofit of which the “Family Justice Center Alliance” has become a program). It also intersected with Telling Amy’s Story, and got under my skin at the time, as it still does.

As does the entire “Family Justice Center” setup.  I still remember “connecting the dots” on discovering that the San Diego Family Justice Center Foundation (it’s full original, corporate name) existed to funnel money to Camp Hope, Inc. — but Camp Hope, Inc. wasn’t staying properly incorporated.  No matter, shut down one version, file for a new one, move the money.  It was a minor, minor detail — charitable registration number was so close, and more recently realizing it’d changed names AGAIN, that got me reviewing the earlier tax returns of this operations. I have been living IN California before, during, and while, this business model was created, funded, and replicated.  It’s worth an entirely separate blog to alert people to what, exactly IS that business model — but I am only one person.

The fuller background on the original (a) philanthropic private wealthy couple and (b) public funds behind the multiple names surrounding both the San Diego Family Justice Center and the associated “Camp Hope” theme, are another separate story which I also learned considerably more fascinating background on this past summer. By doing, the usual thing — scrutinizing tax returns and looking up the entities and people named in them.  Some of this is exposed below in the section with light-brown-background and teal borders.  Actually, influence from “Fuller Seminary” leadership may have been involved so, “fuller background” could be a pun, also.

“Getting” the reality of the Family Justice Center Alliance is, I’d say, as important as getting the reality of the Duluth Model, CCR, treat everyone and let us be the train-the-trainer people concept. So I will continue to bring it up, where it ties into the other subject matter.  Both involve replicating BUSINESS models.  A close diagnosis of the original models then, is always appropriate — and by “diagnosis” I mean, accounting-wise.  This can’t be just one organization, but involve the various related organizations (translation:  “networks”) to construct something of a picture of operations.  Even for people who weren’t “there,” right on scene locally — it can still be done.

6/4/2011 post begins here.  Interjections from 2016 will have a different background color.  If they get too long in the writing, I’ll move them to a separate post.  It also looks like HHS/TAGGS database just got radically revised and (at first glance) I don’t see how one can access any data before the year 2007 (previously, it went back to 1995).  See very bottom of this post.

I am moving part of this post to a 3rd “Part”….


The Nonprofit Preventing Family Violence and Dispensing Family Justice world can be a very friendly set of associates.  In getting to know these individuals, besides hearing what they say & write (including positively about each other), I think it’s also helpful to look at who is paying how much for the time and the talents.Getting to know each other …

On a  recent [in 6/2011] post and here (currently), there is a graphic of Ellen Pence — well-known in Domestic Violence circles — interviewing Casey Gwinn, well known in San Diego and for his work on the National Family Justice Center Alliance, i.e., for starting it.

(broken link to “Interview of Ellen Pence by Casey Gwinn was “http://nfjca.mediasite.com/mediasite/Viewer/?peid=bd05931ed27e4ab9afc89c5878e74ce21d“)

(second broken link to “Interview of Ellen Pence by Casey Gwinn” was “http://telling.psu.edu/“)

[This color background inside green borders in this post designates my 2016 UPDATES}


2016 “Broken link” substitute:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bZeppoVr5f0&feature=youtube (Found by searching; found at a wordpress blog complaining about the feminist ideology.  I may know the individual who posted it)..  Youtube summary with this video (may not be the same one) describes it as:

On March 29, 2010, Casey Gwinn interviewed Ellen Pence in St. Paul, Minnesota for three hours. Ellen and Casey focused on the recent release of the Blueprint for Safety by Praxis International and on the work and future of the Family Justice Center movement in America. This video is a 41 minute edited version of the interview. It was played at the International Family Justice Center Conference on April 28, 2010. The National Family Justice Center Alliance, in partnership with the Verizon Foundation, will be making available the entire interview in the next 60 days. Please remember Ellen in your thoughts and prayers as she battles cancer. She has played a powerful leadership role in the domestic violence movement for over 30 years. The impact of her vision, work, and leadership is profound and will help shape the struggle to stop domestic violence for many years to come in the United States and around the world.

Ellen Pence did battle, but did not beat, cancer, and died within about two years.

Ellen Pence Obituary, January 19, 2012 by Julie Bindel in The Guardian (UK)

Ellen Pence aimed to teach offenders to accept responsibility for their actions and to desire change

It is not an easy task to make an audience roar with laughter while lecturing on domestic violence and homicide, but such was the compelling humour of Ellen Pence, who has died of breast cancer aged 63. Pence was a pioneer in creating and promoting innovative strategies to deal with domestic abuse. The training she developed, and the accessible and motivational way in which she delivered it, changed the way violence towards women and children in the home is viewed.

In 1980 she founded the Domestic Abuse Intervention Project, widely known as the Duluth model (named after the Minnesota city where it was developed). Based on an inter-agency approach in which police, probation services, courts, social services and women’s advocacy projects work together to assess risk, protect victims and deal effectively with the abuser, this strategy remains a blueprint across the US and UK.

.. The Duluth model pioneered the somewhat controversial perpetrator programmes for abusive men which now run in several countries as an alternative to, or as part of, a custodial sentence for domestic violence offences. Pence always had a clear understanding that abusive men can change if those working with them have the appropriate training, skills and tools. She created the programme with the aim of teaching offenders to accept responsibility for their actions and to desire change.

If you don’t know this material yet, please read the rest of the article.  The key concept of promoting TREATMENT PLANS as alternative to CRIMINAL (“custodial” — meaning, incarceration) sentence for “domestic violence offences”), i.e., often called “batterers intervention programs” is a MAJOR big fish to swallow along with the field.  It is in my opinion, one of the main problems with the response to DV as those intent on their persuasive abilities — and focusing on TRAINING, at many levels has simply reinforced a focus on the perps, and not those perpetrated upon.  This is now so engrained it would be tough to re-consider.  Entire conferences, associations, agenda, and grants streams might need to be re-arranged — and once people are involved, who wants to do that?
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