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Possibly Certifiable Insanity (Stockpiling Mental Health Research Grants, “Discretionary,”nationwide).

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In response to wondering how to communicate to one state’s legislator that any new Fatherhood Initiative, either precisely worded or inspiringly vague, though powerfully phrased, is indeed superfluous, I simply researched (again, in this state) two known existing fatherhood programs (at least under one Federal Department) — the one with “fatherhood” in its name, “CFDA 93.086, Healthy Marriage Promotion and Responsible Fatherhood” and the ones which has the intended effect of a “required outcome” to the legal process, namely “Access Visitation” grants, CFDA 93.597, commonly known as putting more time in the hands of the noncustodial parent (a.k.a. father), through moving the decision-making process outside the courtroom, until it has been screened by mediators, custody evaluators, and parenting planners.  (See my Cooks in the Court Kitchen Post).  Yes, these grants were making it to Kansas as well as to the rest of the U.S. (including V.I., P.R. & Guam).

Note:  in the database “usaspending.gov” and under “Grant search by program” it is impossible to search readily by 93.086, as it’s not on the list of hyperlinks.  I tend to feel this was not accidental.

 

CFDA Number = 93086

State = KANSAS
Fiscal Year = 2008

Recipient: CATHOLIC CHARITIES 
Recipient ZIP Code: 67214

FY Award Number Budget Year
of Support
Agency Award Code Action
Issue Date
Amount
This Action
2008 90FE0112 3 ACF 0  09-14-2008 $530,368.00
Award Subtotal: $530,368.00

CFDA Number = 93597
State = KANSAS
Fiscal Year = 2008

Recipient: KS ST DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL & REHABILITATION SERVICES 
Recipient ZIP Code: 66612

FY Award Number Budget Year
of Support
Agency Award Code Action
Issue Date
Amount
This Action
2008 0801KSSAVP 1 ACF 1  01-30-2008 $100,000.00
Award Subtotal: $100,000.00

 

I noticed how MANY types of things are administered directly through the KS ST Office of the Governor, which to me seems a little over-centralized and top-heavy.

While looking, I marveled that both  Abstinence Education and Community Based Abstinence-Education grants with Medical research on Male Contraception (guess which funding won out??)  (Actually both types got the grants,

so I suppose the winners are, however, those grants benefitted — or will — and the losers are the taxpayers — if they didn’t.  For example,

based on several factors, I’d say the Abstinence Education is a bust.  Not that I’m anti-Abstinence, hey, but how many decades is this going to be tried?   Since there is a Community-Based stipulation, the kind this decorative adjective, is government-based.  In fact, come to think of it, what has happened to just generalized DISCRETION in education, period?  The concept that “education” won’t happen without a program (particularly a government run one) is just a little “out there” to start with.  

I also believe that if there were better things to do in class, or young people had a vision for surviving past 20 (in some communities), or succeeding in life, there just might be a little less screwing around before financial independence.  Also what might be helpful if there was a general tendency to point them in the direction of financial independence, throughout the public schools.  We are, however, generally speaking (it seems) teaching the vast majority to hope to hold a job, rather than hope to own or run a business.  After all, can’t EVERYONE run a business (?) so someone has to be the employees, right? 

What better way to ensure a constant supply of willing employees (and a surplus of them, too) by the caste/income/race-sorting system we call public school education?  

The local child support agency (the one that “bailed” in my case, coming to the rescue of the father who’d rather take the kids than get a job) is frequently airing its successes and programs on the local cable TV.  What they don’t tell us, in the programs aimed at  young teens, is how they treat middle-aged parents in the family law venue.  OR WHY . . . . . Too bad, that. . . . 

 

Anyhow, in Kansas, a VERY small segment of what appears to be a wonderful research center, really:

 

Fiscal Year OPDIV Grantee Name Award Title Sum of Actions
2003  NIH  UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS CENTER FOR RESEARCH INC  STEREOTYPES, SHIFTING STANDARDS, AND SOCIAL JUDGEMENT  $ 138,291 
2002  NIH  UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS CENTER FOR RESEARCH INC  STEREOTYPES, SHIFTING STANDARDS, AND SOCIAL JUDGEMENT  $ 155,041 
2001  NIH  UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS CENTER FOR RESEARCH INC  STEREOTYPES, SHIFTING STANDARDS, AND SOCIAL JUDGEMENT  $ 182,417 
2000  NIH  UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS CENTER FOR RESEARCH INC  STEREOTYPES, SHIFTING STANDARDS, AND SOCIAL JUDGEMENT  $ 177,105 
1999  NIH  UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS CENTER FOR RESEARCH INC  STEREOTYPES, SHIFTING STANDARDS, AND SOCIAL JUDGEMENT  $160,365

(for the sake of margins, the same grant award, but , different fields displaying).  

2003  R01MH048844  93242  DISCRETIONARY  SCIENTIFIC/HEALTH RESEARCH (INCLUDES SURVEYS)  NON-COMPETING CONTINUATION  MONICA R BIERNAT  $ 138,291 
2002  R01MH048844  93242  DISCRETIONARY  SCIENTIFIC/HEALTH RESEARCH (INCLUDES SURVEYS)  NON-COMPETING CONTINUATION  MONICA R BIERNAT  $ 155,041 
2001  R01MH048844  93242  DISCRETIONARY  SCIENTIFIC/HEALTH RESEARCH (INCLUDES SURVEYS)  NON-COMPETING CONTINUATION  MONICA R BIERNAT  $ 182,417 
2000  R01MH048844  93242  DISCRETIONARY  SCIENTIFIC/HEALTH RESEARCH (INCLUDES SURVEYS)  NON-COMPETING CONTINUATION  MONICA R BIERNAT  $ 177,105 
1999  R01MH048844  93242  DISCRETIONARY  SCIENTIFIC/HEALTH RESEARCH (INCLUDES SURVEYS)  COMPETING CONTINUATION  MONICA R BIERNAT  $ 160,365

(Where is the original, the “NEW” of this particular one, after which there was competing, then  non-competing continuation?)

 

 

WHAT, you say, might this be?  It’s CFDA CODE 93242, Mental Health Research . . . . and just the tip of the iceberg on our lust to KNOW (and to predict, and to manage, and to manipulate, and to label, and to — well, it’s all really for the national HEALTH):

We DO want to know why our neighbors (or others, or certain populations, or peoples, or income levels, or etc.) are mentally ill, and to verify (nay, certify) that they are, right?  To help them.  Become more sane.  Like us (case in point, studying all this may not be a sign of sanity…..).

 

I could not (today) find the “abstract” for these, but below are some samples of abstracts (with the word “stereotype” in them):

Mental Health, Discretionary must be a large segment:

AT THE VERY BOTTOM OF THIS POST, I WILL LIST CERTAIN TYES OF RECIPIENTS: (ALL is too many):

 

 

 

(I thought you might enjoy that. . . . )  I’m not quite sure how shifting standards comes under Mental Health (which this grant is listed under), but hey, it takes all types.  I’d love to see the final report. . . . .

Searching Federal HHS grants on just the word “stereotypes” brings up a mix of social and medical sciences, and some overlap.  

 

ONE thing’s clear, it’s being studied.  I wonder if this will reduce the amount of “stereotyping” going on, just as studying domestic

violence has reduced the amount of domestic violence, and promoting responsible fatherhood has produced an abundance of responsible fathers nationwide, diminished the number of, well, ones like Doug Ouellette and such.  (Responsible in business, dangerous in marriage…. or at least being asked to separate from it…)

 

 

For example:

 

R01MH071749        

Arizona

STEREOTYPE THREAT AS A STRESS INDUCED COGNITIVE DEFICIT  NIH  NIMH  $ 588,957 

 

Title Stereotype Threat as a Stress Induced Cognitive Deficit
Award Number R01MH071749
Project Start/End 01-AUG-2004 / 31-MAY-2008
Abstract DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Prior work on stereotype threat (see Steele, Spencer, & Aronson, 2002, for a review) suggests that the stress of being targeted by negative stereotypes can cause stigmatized individuals to perform more poorly on complex cognitive tasks when anything is done to remind them of their membership in a negatively stereotyped group.       

Although research has established the generalizability of these stereotype threat effects, a precise and integrated model of the processes by which negative stereotypes interfere with performance is still needed. This application draws on existing literatures examining how stress impacts cognitive processing and outlines a theoretical model that integrates cognitive, physiological, and affective processes that mediate stereotype threat effects on test performance by reducing an individual’s working memory capacity. This model proposes that negative stereotypes reduce performance in testing situations because they present the individual with inconsistent views about the self that induce,

a) cognitive processing in an attempt to reconcile the inconsistency,

b) a physiological stress response involving increased stress hormones and sympathetic activation, and

c) attempts to suppress felt anxiety.

 

Each of these processes is hypothesized to have a negative effect on an individual’s working memory capacity, a cognitive process integral to any complex mental task. The results of three preliminary experiments are reported to provide evidence that working memory capacity is a key mediator of stereotype threat effects on performance. The 11 experiments that are proposed will expand upon these findings to identify the processes by which stereotype threat interferes with working memory capacity and performance.

{{RATHER THAN, say, DOING something to alleviate the stereotyping in the situation..? }}

 

A significant impact of the present research is that in gaining a better understanding of the stress-related processes that are affected by stereotype threat, it becomes more feasible to develop strategies that will enable individuals to cope successfully with social stigma.

Thesaurus academic achievement, cognition disorder, prejudice, psychological stressor, psychophysiology, social perception, stress, university student anxiety, coping, culture, gender difference, hormone biosynthesis, neural information processing, racial /ethnic difference, self concept, short term memory, social psychology, sympathetic nervous system behavioral /social science research tag, clinical research, human subject, interview, psychological test
PI Name/Title SCHMADER, TONI M.  
PI eMail  
Institution UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA PO BOX 3308 TUCSON, AZ 857223308
Department PSYCHOLOGY
Fiscal Year 2007
ICD NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF MENTAL HEALTH
IRG SPIP

 

 

F31HD058492        

North Carolina

RACE STEREOTYPES AND SELF PERCEPTIONS IN AFRICAN AMERICAN YOUTH  NIH  NICHD  $ 33,879 

 

Title Race stereotypes and self perceptions in African American youth
Award Number F31HD058492
Project Start/End 30-SEP-2008 / 
Abstract DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The purpose of the proposed study is (1) to examine the developmental progression of academic race stereotype endorsement in African American youth; (2) to explore, over time, the impact that academic race stereotype endorsement has on the academic self-concept and self-esteem of Black adolescents; (3) to examine whether racial centrality (i.e., the extent to which being Black is central to an individual’s definition of self) moderates the relationship between stereotype endorsement and self-perceptions; (4) to explore the influence of parental racial socialization messages on academic race stereotype endorsement; and (5) to determine the relationships among stereotype endorsement, racial centrality, racial socialization, and decisions about higher education. 135 African American eleventh graders in a rural school district will participate in the project. These students participated in the first wave of the Adolescent Identity Project when they were in middle school. Written parental and student consent will be required for study participation. Consent letters will be distributed to students in their English classes. Once consent has been received, students will be administered self-report questionnaires in small groups (5-10 students) at their schools. Trained research assistants will instruct students on how to complete each measure and will be available to answer questions. Once questionnaires are completed, the research assistant will thank the students and give them a $5 restaurant gift certificate. In addition, during the students’ 12th grade year, they will be mailed a follow-up packet. Students will be questioned about their college plans (whether or not they are planning to attend college and whether it is a Historically Black College or University), SAT scores (if applicable), end of grade scores, and stereotype endorsement. The proposed study will significantly contribute to the body of knowledge on African American adolescents’ achievement-related beliefs and how they develop and change overtime. Understanding achievement-related beliefs will provide a pathway for explaining the factors that contribute to and promote achievement motivation and academic success for African American adolescents. Public Health Relevance: This Public Health Relevance is not available.
Thesaurus There are no thesaurus terms on file for this project.
PI Name/Title OKEKE, NDIDI A.  
PI eMail okeke@email.unc.edu
Institution UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA CHAPEL HILL Office of Sponsored Research CHAPEL HILL, NC 27599
Department PSYCHOLOGY
Fiscal Year 2008
ICD NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
IRG ZRG1

 

This looks interesting, and like it ought to justify several more fatherhood grants:

 

 
R01DA024029  PATERNAL CRIMINAL JUSTICE INVOLVEMENT AND SUBSTANCE USE IN CHILDREN & ADOLESCENTS  NIH  NIDA  $ 1,592,006 

And, WOW, it’s a new one:  so new, not even any thesaurus terms for the abstract yet.  Started 2008, 

 

Principal Investigator, an Assistant Professor at Columbia, Institution< NY State Psychiatric Institute, and 

the Recipient (by the way, these are hyperlinks; you can click away, as can I…. Start with the grant numbers here) is a scary-sounding:

 

“Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene, Inc.”

Total of all awards: $ 858,685,338

(YES, you read that right:  $858,685,338 from 1997-2009)

OR, from another data resources:

http://www.usaspending.gov/faads/faads.php?recipient_name=Research+Foundation+for+Mental+Hygiene%2C+Inc.&sortby=r&detail=0&datype=T&reptype=r&database=faads&fiscal_year=&detail=-1&datype=T&submit=GO

(i am beginning to wonder whether this is partly WHY the US is the world’s largest “jailor” — population research?).

This one here seems very relevant, but only about $350K:

 

R21HL088620  MEASURING CULTURAL COMPETENCE AND RACIAL BIAS AMONG PHYSICIANS  NIH  NHLBI  $ 346,500 

I mean, I’m sure this would affect quality of health care.  I know I had a sexist oby/gyn for the 2nd child (but I stood up to him, and there was a younger on on duty also, who accepted that not every woman who gives birth should be automatically anesthetized and cut….)

(Then again, the place this grant goes to, I happen to know, got about $127 Million in grants in single year…..)

Here’s one that interests me, as a musician, obviously.  I’m surprised to find $3mil on this, as typically music is the first thing cut from the public school curriculum in tough times  (i.e., periodically…..)

 

R01NS050436  INTEGRATIVE STUDY OF VOCAL DEVELOPMENT  NIH  NINDS  $ 3,219,146 

well, NO, that’s apparently about the male zebra finch. . . .   Go figure…..

 

But $858 million??  over about 12 years?  That’s like, HEY — what’s going ON with that foundation??

It’s not just the “mental hygiene” concept, but the “Mental Hygiene, INC.” Sounds sci-fi.

 

(Added 08-11-09:  I did look up some more on who ARE they?; it’s on the web, and free for anyone else who is willing to put in the time to look.  And a bit of an eye-opener, too.  They have done some good work, helping people after 9/11.  But it’s major business, and was set up in 1952 to facilitate research projects.  )  

 

Title Paternal Criminal Justice Involvement and Substance Use in Children & Adolescents
Award Number R01DA024029
Project Start/End 01-AUG-2008 / 31-MAY-2013
Abstract DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Of the 6.5 million adults who were under some form of correctional supervision in 2000, 3.6 million were parents,[{AND MOSTLY MEN}} thereby affecting 7.1 million minor children. Nationally, approximately 85% of all prisoners are male. Contrary to stereotypes, many of the fathers have significant connections to their children: prior to arrest 44% of incarcerated fathers lived with their children and 65% of the others continued at least monthly contact while in prison. Note however, that among incarcerated fathers >60% reported using drugs in the month before their offense; 25% reported a history of alcohol dependence; 14% reported mental illness and 70% did not have a high school diploma.\    

Yet, despite evidence that parental involvement with the Criminal Justice System (CJS) is related to children’s elevated risk for substance use, psychopathology, and future incarceration, no rigorous studies of a representative sample of such children have been conducted.

{{I thought it was FATHERLESSNESS, not FATHER-INCARCERATION that was the main issue, from what we have been hearing nationally, through the courts, HHS, government, and initiatives….}}

 

A better understanding of the specific impact of paternal incarceration, from a developmental perspective, could be expected to provide insight into ways of tempering or averting many psychosocial adverse outcomes in the youth.

(ANOTHER Idea (mine) might be to find ways to keep the fathers if possible from the behaviors that got them incarcerated to start with. .. . .  And then that’d be one less generation to be so impacted.  What do you think?) 

 

The main objective of this investigation is to understand the impact, over time, of paternal involvement with the CJS on their children’s substance use, psychopathology, and development of risk behaviors leading to involvement with the Juvenile Justice/CJS. This proposal aims to overcome methodological limitations of previous investigations and will provide generalizable findings relevant to developing public policy for improving the lives of affected children, including reducing their risk for substance use and incarceration. Our framework acknowledges that paternal involvement with the CJS occurs in a complex environment, where risk factors cluster, leading to a number of both direct and indirect sequelae. We will recruit a sample of children (ages 10-14) following the arrest of their fathers. The sample will be representative of CJS fathers from a disadvantaged community (the South Bronx, NYC), who have close contact with their child(ren). They will be recruited through collaboration with a publicly assigned legal defense team, the Bronx Defenders. An age- gender matched comparison group of children whose fathers had never been incarcerated will be recruited in the same residential area. The study includes collaboration with agencies whose involvement make this inherently difficult study possible: including the NYC DOE, NYC DOH-MH, NYC ACS, as well as collaborators and advocacy groups, some participating on the Study’s Advisory Board.

PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: From a public health perspective, policy driven decisions regarding youth, especially those at elevated risk for untoward outcomes, must be based on sound scientific data. The goal of the proposed investigation is to advance our knowledge and understanding of the consequences of paternal involvement with the Criminal Justice System on the substance use/abuse/dependence and other psychopathology of their children. Knowledge about the determinants, over time, for negative youth outcomes, as well as protective factors, is critical to advancing targeted interventions in an effort to break the cycle of Criminal Justice involvement of the next generation. Public Health Relevance: This Public Health Relevance is not available.

{{I have a “dumb” idea.  Take some of the monies spent studying male zebra finches, and the ones on lethality risks for domestic violence femicides, which are being ignored in public policy (courts) anyhow, and put them towards things that would help break the cycle of (1) ILLITERACY and with it (2) POVERTY.  Then I suspect — barring continuing racial profiling by arresting officeres, and a few other possible institutional factors (why not study the INSTITUTIONS as much as the people IN them, eh?) there might be lower incarceration rates.  And Research Foundation Inc. could go find something else to research…))

{{PUT IT INTO:  Expressive arts, creative arts, dance, and so forth.  Put it into college scholarships.  Put it into supporting the EXIT from the public school systems that undereducate and badly socialize. . . .  Let’s Get Honest!!}}

Thesaurus There are no thesaurus terms on file for this project.
PI Name/Title HOVEN, CHRISTINA W.  ASSISTANT PROFESSOR
PI eMail ch42@columbia.edu
Institution NEW YORK STATE PSYCHIATRIC INSTITUTE NEW YORK, NY 10032
Department  
Fiscal Year 2008
ICD NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE
IRG RPIA

 

While money will ALWAYS flow to study incarcerated African American males (or females), how about some to help in DOING the studies, not BEING studied?  “Nationally, African Americans, Latin Americans, Native Americans, and some Asian Americans are underrepresented in the sciences and social sciences. ”

 

Maybe this project wasn’t structured right, it only coughed up $81K: but it sounds reasonable to me:

 

 

 
R25MH070369  PROMOTING HS MINORITY ADVANCEMENT IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES  NIH  NIMH  $ 81,491 

Title Promoting HS Minority Advancement in the Social Sciences
Award Number R25MH070369
Project Start/End 01-JUL-2004 / 30-JUN-2006
Abstract DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The long-term goal of the proposed HS-COR Honors Research Training program is to achieve ethnic parity in admissions to (goal=100%) and success in undergraduate programs (goal = 100%) related to the biomedical sciences or mental health fields. Nationally, African Americans, Latin Americans, Native Americans, and some Asian Americans are underrepresented in the sciences and social sciences.     

{{POSSIBLY — just conjecturing here, total hypothesis, but I HAVE been nosing around a lot of these grants for many months now — POSSIBLY because the powers that be would rather STUDY such populations than have them participate in running the studies.  JUST an idea…}}

The specific aims of the program are to increase underrepresented student success by: (a) identifying 6 students who appear to have the greatest potential, (b) training students in the fundamental assumptions, value of, and pitfalls of research, (c) facilitating students’ specific research skills by their working with a faculty mentor on a specific research project, and (d) providing specific information and support to ensure that students have the qualities required to be successful in an undergraduate program, such as assistance with SAT preparation and the presentation of research in science fairs. Students will attend a summer training program on the research process that is designed to build scientific and critical reasoning skills and a practical seminar series and work one-on-one with their research mentors.

Faculty mentors’ research projects reflect a variety of areas including the neuropsychology of Alzheimer’s disease, quality of life of elderly women, effects of stereotype threat on academic achievement of minority students, adolescent wellbeing, and violence prevention. Evaluation of three goals is specified.

The goals are: (a) admission to college;

(b) success while in college; and

(c) professionalism.

Each goal is made more specific and specific program components are matched with each goal.

Thesaurus academic achievement, behavioral /social science, ethnic group, secondary school, training, vocational guidance African American, Asian American, Hispanic American, Native American, health science research potential, mental health personnel, university adolescence (12-20), behavioral /social science research tag, human subject
PI Name/Title QUILICI, JILL L.  
PI eMail jill.quilici@csun.edu
Institution CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY NORTHRIDGE OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND SPONSORED PROJECTS NORTHRIDGE, CA 913308232
Department PSYCHOLOGY
Fiscal Year 2005
ICD NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF MENTAL HEALTH
IRG ZMH1

This might upset a few apple carts and probably wouldn’t be duplicated.  Better to mentor children of prisoners, than potential social science superstars….

 

 

This one got over $1 million, so it must be very important (or, hard to study):

 

R01MH066836        

Massachusetts

FACE OVERGENERALIZATION, PREJUDICE, AND STEREOTYPES  NIH  NIMH  $1,403,454 

Took 4 years.  

$

Award Number R01MH066836
Project Start/End 10-SEP-2003 / 30-JUN-2007
Abstract DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Considerable research demonstrates a strong tendency to use facial appearance when forming first impressions.      

(What’s more, common sense says this as well)

 

Moreover, these impressions show remarkable consensus, yielding significant social consequences.

(ibid).

The long-range objective of the proposed research is to explain consensual first impressions of faces and to develop methods for ameliorating their negative social consequences.

Consensual First Impressions of Faces?  Does this relate to (or, lead to…) “consensual sex.”??

The working hypothesis is that the psychological qualities that are accurately revealed by the functionally significant facial qualities that mark babies, unfitness, emotion, or identity are overgeneralized to people whose facial structure resembles that of babies, a particular level of fitness, a particular emotion, or a particular identity. The research has three specific aims. One is to use connectionist modeling to test the facial identity overgeneralization hypothesis that the tendency for responses to strangers to vary with their facial resemblance to known individuals contributes to racial prejudice and stereotyping.

The connectionist modeling experiments seek to demonstrate that the physical similarity between two faces can in and of itself account for similar impressions of them quite apart from similarities in the social categories of the faces. The second aim is to test whether generalized mere exposure effects can be used to reduce race and age prejudice and stereotyping, as predicted by the facial identity overgeneralization hypothesis. The mere exposure experiments seek to demonstrate that increasing the familiarity of an out-group facial prototype will decrease negative reactions to out-group members. The third aim is to use functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to investigate neural activation patterns in response to faces that are predicted from each of the three overgeneralization hypotheses. The fMRI experiments seek to determine whether categories of faces that are differentiated by human judges’ ratings and by the activation they elicit in connectionist modeling experiments also elicit distinct patterns of neural activation, thereby demonstrating a neural substrate for the overgeneralization effects. By focusing on the structured facial information that influences prejudice and stereotypes, the proposed research brings a novel theoretical perspective to the field of social cognition, demonstrating that the intrinsic properties of faces make a significant contribution to social biases that have been largely viewed as social constructions. It also suggests novel interventions for reducing prejudice.

Thesaurus face, impression, prejudice, racial /ethnic difference bias, face expression, handedness, identity, neural information processing, social perception, visual stimulus behavioral /social science research tag, clinical research, functional magnetic resonance imaging, human old age (65+), human subject, young adult human (21-34)
PI Name/Title ZEBROWITZ, LESLIE A.  PROFESSOR
PI eMail zebrowitz@brandeis.edu
Institution BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 415 SOUTH STREET WALTHAM, MA 024549110
Department PSYCHOLOGY
Fiscal Year 2006
ICD NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF MENTAL HEALTH
IRG ZRG1

 

Total of all awards: $ 1,403,454

 

Oh, Here’s a $2 million one:  Must be longitudinal and very relevant to national health and wellbeing or safety:

 

 
R01HD021332      

TEXAS

ORIGINS AND SIGNIFICANCE OF APPEARANCE-BASED STEREOTYPES  NIH  NICHD  $ 2,352,235 
 
R01HD021332  ORIGINS AND SIGNIFICANCE OF APPEARANCE-BASED STEREOTYPES  NIH  NICHD  $ 2,352,235 

 

Title Origins and Significance of Appearance-Based Stereotypes
Award Number R01HD021332
Project Start/End 01-SEP-1986 / 31-DEC-2007
Abstract This abstract is not available.
Thesaurus There are no thesaurus terms on file for this project.
PI Name/Title LANGLOIS, JUDITH H.  CHARLES AND SARAH SEAY REGENTS’ PROFESSO
PI eMail langlois@psy.utexas.edu
Institution UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AUSTIN PO Box 7726 AUSTIN, TX 78713
Department PSYCHOLOGY
Fiscal Year 2007
ICD NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
IRG ZRG1

(NOTE:  project duration says 1986 – 2007.  These records therefore don’t show 1986 – 1997, probably similar amounts/year.

Well, since this project was over with one and a half years ago, perhaps we can write and find out what they learned.

http://homepage.psy.utexas.edu/homepage/group/LangloisLAB/

http://www.psy.utexas.edu/psy/crl.html#scope

 

CRL Logo

The Children’s Research Laboratory (CRL) was founded in January 1982 to facilitate training and research on a wide variety of topics relating to infant and child development. We are located in the Seay Psychology building at the corner of Dean Keeton and Speedway on the University of Texas campus.

Approximately 7 faculty members and 20 graduate students currently conduct research at the CRL. While most are affiliated with the Department of Psychology, research assistance also has been provided to faculty from the Linguistics Department, the Department of Human Ecology, and the College of Education. Our current facility includes a waiting room for parents, numerous laboratory suites, offices for faculty and graduate researchers, a student lounge, and a developmental psychology library. Space is also available for visiting faculty and post-doctoral fellows. In addition, the CRL provides invaluable training to approximately 150 undergraduate students per year. Their close work with both graduate students and faculty on specific research projetcts prepares them for graduate work toward advanced degrees or other careers involving children.

Our research has examined a broad range of topics, including studies of infant vision and audition, the early development of cognitive and intellectual ability, the development of language, parent-infant interaction, social stereotypes by young children and adults, and the causes of parental abuse of children. Research projects at the CRL are funded primarily through federal and private foundation funds.

 

Rebecca Anne HossJudith H. LangloisRebecca BiglerJacqueline D. WoolleyRobert A. JosephsKristin Neff, …

This dissertation is dedicated to all those who have supported and guided me in my quest for a graduate degree in psychology, including my loving husband Chance Lawson, my unconditionally supportive…

 

 

http://www.jstor.org/pss/1129416

Peer Relations as a Function of Physical Attractiveness: The Eye of the Beholder or Behavioral Reality?

(Abstract:)

The relation between physical attractiveness and behavior was examined by assessing whether behavioral differences exist between attractive and unattractive children.

{{As determined by . . . . .??}}

64   3- and 5-year-old boys and girls were selected as subjects on the basis of physical attractiveness. Same age and sex, attractive, unattractive, and mixed-attractiveness dyads were formed and were observed in a seminaturalistic play setting. A categorical observation system was used to record affiliative, aggressive, activity-, and object-directed play behaviors. A developmental pattern was found for aggression: no differences based on attractiveness were evident in 3-year-olds, but 5-year-old unattractive children aggressed against peers more often than did attractive children. Unattractive children were generally more active than attractive children. Few differences in affiliative behaviors were found between attractive and unattractive children.

>>>>

Phew!

This is a side-note to a Judith Langlois site, but I don’t think the topic is “incidental” to WHAT is our federal HHS department doing with these grants (and why):  


INTRODUCTION

It is useful to distinguish, in a first approximation, between behavioral biology in general, and the more special fields of classical comparative psychology, classical ethology, and the newer fields of sociobiology and evolutionary psychology. Contemporary animal behavior research often tries to combine the methods and insights of the experimental approach of comparative psychology with the field observational approach of ethology. Comparative psychology originated in North America as a branch of experimental psychology; its practitioners were mainly interested in differences between species, especially in intelligence and learning. Classical ethology is a branch of biology that originated in Europe, used observational rather than experimental methods, and was interested first and foremost in the naturally occurring behavior of animals. Although the dichotomy must not be overstressed, animal behaviorists tend to be trained in psychology, work with “bright” animals, and generally are interested in learned behaviors; while contemporary ethologists, sociobiologists, and evolutionary psychologists are likely to concentrate on innate behaviors. While the study of learned behavior is both important and immediately applicable to human psychology, these behaviors do not have an evolutionary basis beyond the neural capacity to learn. (For a more detailed account of the differences between these traditions, see, e.g., Barry Sinervo.)

The research covered in this area introduction encompasses a very large domain. For the sake of convenience, we have divided it in clusters that are listed alphabetically under the conventional labels “animal behavior,” “animal cognition,” “ethology,” “behavioral ecology,” “cognitive ecology,” “neuroethology,” “sociobiology,” and “evolutionary psychology.” It should be borne in mind throughout that these labels reflect little more than the contingencies of the history of behavioral biology, and that in practice, the boundaries between these sub-areas tend to be quite blurred.

 

The question I pose is whether historians and social scientists have much to gain from models of cultural evolution that treat cultural change as a kind of selection process. Can such models provide a unifying paradigm for the social sciences that plays the same role in the study of human culture that models of biological evolution play in biology as a whole?

As an explanatory theory of human behavior, dynamical ((Kind of dynamic, but not quite, so only “dynamical”??)  models of cultural evolution and social learning hold more promise of success than models based on rational choice. Under the right conditions, evolutionary models supply a rationale for Nash equilibrium that rational choice theory is hard pressed to deliver. Furthermore, in cases with multiple symmetrical Nash equilibria, the dynamic models offer a plausible, historically path-dependent model of equilibrium selection. In conditions, such as those of correlated encounters, where the evolutionary dynamic theory is structurally at odds with the rational choice theory, the evolutionary theory provides the best account of human behavior.

— Brian Skyrms 

 Evolutionary Psychology (EP)

EP was articulated in the wake of human sociobiology’s unsuccessful attempts (most notably, Lumsden/Wilson 1981) to come to grips with gene-culture coevolution. Its goal is to uncover “the psychological mechanisms that underpin human … behavior, and … the selective forces that shaped those mechanisms” (Donald Symons). Its key assumptions are, in Eric Alden Smith’s accurate summary, modularity (human behavior is guided by specialized cognitive mechanisms performing specialized tasks); historicity (natural selection shaped those modules to produce adaptive behavior in the paleolithic EEA or “environment of evolutionary adaptedmess”); adaptive specificity (adaptive outcomes, e.g., mate preference, are very specific); and environmental novelty (modern environments are characterized by an unprecedented degree of novelty). From these assumptions, EP deduces that valid adaptive explanations must refer to genetically evolved psychological mechanisms linked to specific features of the EEA; that “culture,” “learning,” “rational choice,” and “fitness maximization” are insufficiently modular to be explanatorily realistic mechanisms, whether cognitive or behavioral; that contemporary human behavior may often be maladaptive; and that measuring fitness outcomes or correlates of contemporary behavioral patterns is irrelevant.

 

{{I”m tempted to add, this includes collective institutional behavior in many matters.  Either we (so to speak) are trying to study, manage, and predict human behavior, so as to better MANAGE it, (evolutionary bias) OR we (so to speak) are trying to enforce a certain religious paradigm on the entire country, a paradigm in which all animals are equal, but SOME (male) animals are more equal than others.  And, anyone, incidentally, who doesn’t agree with the above will be tortured in one (or more) institutions, until they do.   How this differs IN THEORY AND PRACTICE with what this SAME United States is sending troops overseas to quell (insurgents, and make the world safe for “democracy,” I’m not sure – – it does have frightening similarities.  Except, in many other countries, I could probably only put up ONE blog post saying this. . . . . .  if I dared.  We DO make fun of our government pretty well, I admit }}

 

ANYHOW, do you catch the flavor of the lingo?

 

By the way, calling people “bipolar” is popular these days.  Never fear, a “Special Unit of Government” is on it, since about 2002, with a Mental Health Research Discretionary type grants. Apparently designed for this particular recipient only: (this is the only recipient that came up under Mental Health Research Discretionary and “Special Unit of Government.”

 

 

 

Fiscal Year Grantee Name State Grantee Class Award Title Award Action Type Sum of Actions
2009  CAMBRIDGE HEALTH ALLIANCE  MA  Special Unit of Government  ADVANCED CENTER FOR LATINO AND MH SYSTEMS RESEARCH  NON-COMPETING CONTINUATION  $ 821,185 
2009  CAMBRIDGE HEALTH ALLIANCE  MA  Special Unit of Government  INNOVATIONS IN THE MEASUREMENT OF RACIAL/ETHNIC DISPARITIES IN MENTAL HEALTH CARE  NON-COMPETING CONTINUATION  $ 85,881 
2009  CAMBRIDGE HEALTH ALLIANCE  MA  Special Unit of Government  LITHIUM MAGNETIC RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPY OF CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS WITH BIPOLAR  NEW  $- 105,248 
2008  CAMBRIDGE HEALTH ALLIANCE  MA  Special Unit of Government  ADVANCED CENTER FOR LATINO AND MH SYSTEMS RESEARCH  NON-COMPETING CONTINUATION  $ 906,904 
2008  CAMBRIDGE HEALTH ALLIANCE  MA  Special Unit of Government  INNOVATIONS IN THE MEASUREMENT OF RACIAL/ETHNIC DISPARITIES IN MENTAL HEALTH CARE  NEW  $ 85,844 
2008  CAMBRIDGE HEALTH ALLIANCE  MA  Special Unit of Government  LITHIUM MAGNETIC RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPY OF CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS WITH BIPOLAR  NEW  $ 213,300 
2007  CAMBRIDGE HEALTH ALLIANCE  MA  Special Unit of Government  A TREATMENT OUTCOME ANALYSIS FOR BEHAVIORAL ADDICTIONS  NON-COMPETING CONTINUATION  $ 77,680 
2007  CAMBRIDGE HEALTH ALLIANCE  MA  Special Unit of Government  ADVANCED CENTER FOR LATINO AND MH SYSTEMS RESEARCH  NON-COMPETING CONTINUATION  $ 951,551 
2006  CAMBRIDGE HEALTH ALLIANCE  MA  Special Unit of Government  A TREATMENT OUTCOME ANALYSIS FOR BEHAVIORAL ADDICTIONS  NEW  $ 80,000 
2006  CAMBRIDGE HEALTH ALLIANCE  MA  Special Unit of Government  ADVANCED CENTER FOR LATINO AND MH SYSTEMS RESEARCH  NON-COMPETING CONTINUATION  $ 985,750 
2006  CAMBRIDGE HEALTH ALLIANCE  MA  Special Unit of Government  ADVANCED CENTER FOR LATINO AND MH SYSTEMS RESEARCH  SUPPLEMENT FOR EXPANSION  $ 59,555 
2006  CAMBRIDGE HEALTH ALLIANCE  MA  Special Unit of Government  HMO SELECTION INCENTIVES AND UNDERPROVISION OF MH CARE  NON-COMPETING CONTINUATION  $ 80,561 
2005  CAMBRIDGE HEALTH ALLIANCE  MA  Special Unit of Government  ADVANCED CENTER FOR LATINO AND MH SYSTEMS RESEARCH  NEW  $ 921,689 
2005  CAMBRIDGE HEALTH ALLIANCE  MA  Special Unit of Government  HMO SELECTION INCENTIVES AND UNDERPROVISION OF MH CARE  NEW  $ 82,500 
2004  CAMBRIDGE HEALTH ALLIANCE  MA  Special Unit of Government  PSYCHOPATHOLOGY AND CONTROLLING BEHAVIOR IN ADOLESCENTS.  NON-COMPETING CONTINUATION  $ 200,000 
2003  CAMBRIDGE HEALTH ALLIANCE  MA  Special Unit of Government  LATINO RESEARCH PROGRAM PROJECT  NON-COMPETING CONTINUATION  $ 898,383 
2003  CAMBRIDGE HEALTH ALLIANCE  MA  Special Unit of Government  PSYCHOPATHOLOGY AND CONTROLLING BEHAVIOR IN ADOLESCENTS.  NON-COMPETING CONTINUATION  $ 280,000 
2002  CAMBRIDGE HEALTH ALLIANCE  MA  Special Unit of Government  PSYCHOPATHOLOGY AND CONTROLLING BEHAVIOR IN ADOLESCENTS.  NON-COMPETING CONTINUATION  $ 280,000 

Total (quick-check) $6,753,531

WHO, you may say, is the Cambridge Health Alliance, and what are they doing?  What’s so special about them?

Psychopathology and controlling behavior in adolescents. . . . . . . Perhaps someone ought to study where they’ve been for the prior teen years, and take a look at which institutions as well as which environments. . . . .  

5R01MH62030-020 (Federal Grant ID — you can look it up):

 

Title Psychopathology and Controlling Behavior in Adolescents.
Award Number R01MH062030
Project Start/End 25-SEP-2001 / 31-AUG-2006
Abstract DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Recent attachment-related studies {{PROBABLY ALSO FEDERALLY FUNDED}} have demonstrated that both childhood behavior problems and adolescent psychopathology are predicted by (1) disorganized infant attachment behavior, behavior that is characterized by conflicting behavioral tendencies and the lack of a coherent relational strategy for dealing with stress (2). However, based on current literature, it is unclear whether a validated measure of disorganized attachment in adolescence exists.(3) 

 

The first aim of the proposed study is to develop and validate a coding protocol for identifying controlling-punitive, controlling-caregiving, and other insecure-disorganized behavior in adolescence. (4) The coding scheme will be based on previous work in the field (5) and will be applied to two attachment-related parent-adolescent interaction assessments. Participants will be 120 adolescents and their mothers from low-income families, (6)  65 of whom who have participated in a longitudinal study at ages 12 and 18 months, 4-5 years, and 7-9 year. (7) The construct validity of the new measure of controlling attachment strategies will be assessed in relation to coding of Unresolved or Cannot Classify attachment strategies as assessed by the Adult Attachment Interview and will also be validated against broader aspects of parent-adolescent interaction assessed in a standard revealed differences conflict resolution task, as coded by the Autonomy and Relatedness Scales. (8)

The second aim of the study is to assess whether overall risk in infancy is an important antecedent of disorganized/controlling attachment strategies in adolescence. (9)

  Mediational models will test whether the onset of behavior problems in the early school years or the mother’s lack of facilitation of automony and relatedness in adolescence adds to and/or mediates any observed relation between early relational risk and adolescent attachment behaviors. (10) The third aim of the study is to assess the degree to which adolescent disorganized/controlling attachment strategies are associated with adolescent psychiatric morbidity. Psychiatric diagnoses will be assessed by the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnosis (SCID) Axis I, the borderline and antisocial personality disorder sections of the SCID II, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) , and the Adolescent Dissociative Experiences Scale (ADES). Longitudinal analyses will further assess the degree to which early relational risk and early school age behavior problems are important precursors of adolescent psychopathology. The proposed study will contribute to increased understanding of long-term developmental trajectories that eventuate in psychopathology. In order to implement prevention or treatment programs for reducing adolescent antisocial behavior and psychopathology, it is essential {{FOR WHOM??}} to seek a thorough understanding of the developmental pathways through which such behavior develops over time.  

Thesaurus adolescence (12-20), child behavior disorder, child psychology, longitudinal human study, low socioeconomic status, parent offspring interaction, psychopathology age difference, behavior prediction, caregiver, conflict, depression, disease /disorder proneness /risk, gender difference, human morbidity, infant human (0-1 year), maternal behavior, mental disorder diagnosis, psychoanalysis, psychological stressor, psychosocial separation, racial /ethnic difference behavioral /social science research tag, clinical research, human subject, interview, videotape /videodisc
PI Name/Title LYONS-RUTH, KARLEN  ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
PI eMail klruth@hms.harvard.edu
Institution CAMBRIDGE HEALTH ALLIANCE 1493 CAMBRIDGE ST CAMBRIDGE, MA 02139
Department  
Fiscal Year 2004
ICD NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF MENTAL HEALTH
IRG ZRG1

COMMENTARY BELOW:

 

 

 

Assistance to Recipient(s) “Cambridge Health Alliance”
(FY 2000-2009)

Summary

 

Federal dollars: $25,309,682
Total number of recipients: 1
Total number of transactions: 87 


Top 5 Known Congressional Districts where Recipients are Located Known Congressional District help link

 Massachusetts 08 (Michael E. Capuano) $8,151,249

Top 10 Recipients

 CAMBRIDGE HEALTH ALLIANCE $25,309,682

Recipient Type

Government $20,271,453
Other $4,681,488
Nonprofits $311,588
For Profits $41,653
Higher Education $3,500
Individuals $0

 

Type of projects:  Top 5.

 

 93.242: Mental Health Research Grants  (Doesn’t quite match the total above, eh?, same category) $11,129,223
 93.145: AIDS Education and Training Centers $3,953,377
 93.252: Healthy Communities Access Program $2,476,400
 93.887: Health Care and Other Facilities $1,633,902
 93.243: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services_Projects of Regional and National Significance $1,450,000

 

 

 

93.243: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services_Projects of Regional and National Significance $1,450,000

 

 

..

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